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Harley-Davidson Ultra Low Grander Puts a New Spin on the Electra Glide

Believe it or not, today’s quite extensive lineup of Harley-Davidson Grand American Touring motorcycles traces its roots all the way back to the 1940s, when the Milwaukee bike maker introduced the famed FL.
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In the meantime, the lineup grew to no less than 14 motorcycle variants Harley sells as part of this family, by far the most extensive currently being made. It starts with the Electra Glide Standard and ends with the CVO Road Glide Limited, and it’s probably one of the most visible collections of bikes currently roaming America’s roads.

Over in Europe, these touring machines are far less present, both in stock form and modified in some way by the many shops present there. That’s not to say they’re completely absent, but they’re rare enough to cause quite a stir once they come around the bend.

Especially if they look like this one here, a 2018 Electra Glide gifted with a much more custom look by a Polish garage going by the name Nine Hills Motorcycles.

Called Ultra Low Grander past-transformation, the Electra Glide is supposed to be “full of tasteful accessories, original and perfectly finished.” A revised look was mostly achieved by ridding the machine of the chrome it originally had on, and replacing that with black powder paint, generously sprayed on things like the stock engine, crash bars, and wheels.

On top of that, the shop fitted leather upholstery with a red thread (and matched by red accents all over), but also a gloss finish, because even non-chrome machines must be shiny.

Mechanically, we’re not told anything about the changes made, except the fact we know there are Screamin’ Eagle air filter and exhaust system in there.

Nine Hills doesn’t say anything about the price of this build either, but the changes made more than definitely put the new price well over the about $20,000 mark a brand new Electra Glide goes for.

 
 
 
 
 

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