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Harley-Davidson Skullrock Is What Happens to Unsuspecting American Bikes in Germany

Harley-Davidsons may have been born in America, but they surely reach their full potential over in Europe, where a long list of custom shops is hard at work reinterpreting whatever two-wheelers Milwaukee dreams of making. And of entire Europe, one place seems to be in love with Harleys more than others: Germany.
Harley-Davidson Skullrock 23 photos
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The country has a very solid custom motorcycle industry, with a large number of garages competing to come up with the most impressive projects. One of the most successful in this respect is Thunderbike, a name we’ve featured here on autoevolution countless times before.

This time, we’re focusing on their most recent project, a converted Softail that was rechristened Skullrock. If anything, this one stands out through fine touches and elegant solutions, but it does sport the usual complement of Thunderbike changes.

A total of 24 parts are listed as having been used for the build, starting with the smaller ones (covers for the frame, brake calipers, front and rear axles, swingarm), to the more complex, like the ones that allowed for the 16-inch wheel ar the rear to be respoked, the bike to be lowered by 30 mm, and the ignition coil to be relocated.

The bike received a new Dr. Jekill & Mr. Hyde exhaust system, and that’s about the only major change made to the otherwise stock engine. Up front, new handlebars were fitted, with the mirrors mounted under the grips, while the entire body of the machine now sports here and there the magical touch of leather.

Thunderbike does not officially say how much the Skullrock cost to put together, but the parts they list as having been used do come with price stickers, and we know that they alone (that means without the skull-filled paint job, exhaust, and man-hours) amount to almost 4,000 euros, which is $4,200 at today’s exchange rates.

 
 
 
 
 

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