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Harley-Davidson Indra Shows the Vicious Side of American Muscle Bikes

In Sanskrit, the name Indra harkens back to an ancient Vedic deity and it supposedly means the one who "possesses rain." Or, in a wider scope, it's something related to the sky and rain, and that generally gives us a feeling of coziness and serenity. Which is exactly the opposite of what the Harley-Davidson Indra makes us feel.
Harley-Davidson Indra 14 photos
Photo: Bad Land
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That's the name custom motorcycle garage chose for the modified Harley-Davidson V-Rod sitting before us. A 2016 model-year American muscle bike by birth, it was transformed into a collection of metal bits so vicious it puts the base model, it too something to fear, in a cone of shadow.

We're used to seeing amazing custom elements making it onto various two-wheelers, but Japanese crew Bad Land has a special talent for making them look pointier, sharper, and more dangerous than what all other shops combined are capable of.

I mean, just look at that fork, or the swingarm. These things, meant to support the front and rear wheels, are only mildly modified in most cases, but the Japanese have gotten us to going overboard by choosing a much more sculpted approach.

The fork holds in place a Bad Land-made wheel 21 inches in diameter, with the one at the rear coming in at 18 inches and 300 mm in width. The choice of size for the rear wheel effectively makes the V-Rod look ready to shoot itself with immense power to whatever destination the rider needs to reach.

Avon Cobra tires sitting under custom fenders are wrapped around both wheels to ensure grip, while a combination of Rick's Motorcycles and Brembo braking hardware is there to handle stopping needs.

The frame of the bike is the original one, but it has been modified to support the fitting of the new fork and swingarm, but also of the lowered seat and enlarged fuel tank. The changes did not affect the bike's engine, which remains as it was when it rolled out the factory doors.

Mostly, at least, as the thing's breathing apparatus is now aftermarket, comprising a Bad Land air filter at one end and a full custom exhaust, with the pipes pointing up toward the rear, at the other.

The body of the bike was made more muscular with the fitting of various modified covers where covers were needed, and a radiator cover up front. A modified handlebar with rectangular mirrors and Ken's Factory grips, LED turn signals, and a license plate relocation to one side complete the look of the ride.

The Harley-Davidson Indra comes with no sticker revealing its post-conversion price, like we're used to from Bad Land. Just a quick look at all the modifications made makes it clear though the end product must not be cheap.
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About the author: Daniel Patrascu
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Daniel loves writing (or so he claims), and he uses this skill to offer readers a "behind the scenes" look at the automotive industry. He also enjoys talking about space exploration and robots, because in his view the only way forward for humanity is away from this planet, in metal bodies.
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