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Great-Looking 1988 BMW R100 RS Saw Its Fair Share of Miles, Is Still in Tip-Top Shape

Just like its RT cousin, the R100 RS is cherished for its ability to tackle long-distance rides with gusto.
1988 BMW R 100 RS 42 photos
1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS1988 BMW R 100 RS
To put it simply, few classic motorcycles can match the sport-touring pedigree of BMW’s revered R100 RS lineup. With their dependable twin-cylinder engines, wind tunnel-developed bodywork and comfortable, yet sporty ergonomics, these machines can devour highway miles like there’s no tomorrow. Even by today’s standards, the R100 RS is a force to be reckoned with in its segment!

What we’re about to examine is a 1988 variant that still looks the part after 66k miles (106,000 km) of faithful service. Recently, the retro sport-tourer pictured above these paragraphs saw its carburetors and ignition timing adjusted for optimized performance, and the maintenance work was ultimately concluded with the addition of fresh fluids under current ownership.

Behind the Beemer’s streamlined full-fairing, one may find an air-cooled 980cc boxer-twin power source that’s mated to a five-speed transmission and a dry single-plate clutch. Featuring two valves per cylinder head, dual constant-depression Bing inhalers and a solid compression ratio of 9.5:1, the four-stroke engine is good for up to 70 hp and 56 pound-feet (76 Nm) of twisting force at the crankshaft.

The oomph is fed to the rear wheel by means of a driveshaft, and it can push Motorrad’s phenom from zero to 62 mph (100 kph) in 4.6 seconds. Once that’s done, the R100 RS will continue accelerating to a top speed of 124 mph (200 kph), and it comes to a halt thanks to dual brake discs up front and a traditional drum at the opposite end.

In the suspension sector, BMW’s icon carries telescopic forks and a single shock absorber, which is mounted on the right-hand side of the rear hoop. This ‘88 MY airhead is offered at no reserve on Bring a Trailer, but you’ve only got until tomorrow (May 28) to submit your bids if you’d like to snatch it. At the moment, one would be required to spend about $5,000 in order to dethrone the top bidder.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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