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Grabber Blue 1971 Ford Mustang Boss 351 Looks Good as New

The main thing you should know about early 70s Mustangs is that despite a radically different appearance, technically, they were still part of this model’s first-generation. The ‘71 Mustang grew in size compared to its predecessor, as Ford attempted to meet the demand for bigger and more elegant vehicles. Some still call it a facelift, but that doesn’t even begin to describe all the changes.
1971 Ford Mustang Boss 351 in Grabber Blue 22 photos
Photo: Hemmings
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Equally important is that after 1974, the Blue Oval began to downsize the Mustang to make it more fuel-efficient, so in a sense, those late-model first-gen “facelifted” cars were among the last to feature any type of imposing design. The Mustang wouldn’t return to those roots until 2005, with the launch of the fifth-gen model.

While 1971 through '73 Mustangs will likely always be a little controversial, it’s hard not to look fondly at the Boss 351 variant, especially since its 330 hp (335 PS) and 370 lb-ft (502 Nm) of torque made it more powerful than the older Boss 302. Some even say that it had “more usable performance” than the Boss 429. Alas, that 5.8-liter Windsor V8, on paper, could get you from zero to 60 mph (96 kph) in 5.8 seconds, which is reasonably quick even by today’s standards.

So, what about this car, you ask? It’s a 1971 Mustang Boss 351 with 37,940 miles (61,000 km) on the clock. As per its Hemmings ad, there’s a stock 351 V8 under the hood with no reported issues.

The seller did, however, replace the original exhaust manifolds with long-tube headers that work alongside a custom dual exhaust system. This should result in an even greater soundtrack than before. As for the gearbox, it’s a four-speed manual, so enthusiasts should be thrilled with that setup.

The exterior, meanwhile, was professionally restored to feature its original shade of Grabber Blue; according to CJ PonyParts, only 131 units of the Mustang Boss 351 exist in this color. The body also has silver-painted front and rear spoilers, as well as silver accent stripes.

As for the interior, it’s at least just as impressive as the outer shell, featuring re-trimmed black vinyl bucket seats and console, an AM/FM radio, aftermarket wood-rimmed steering wheel, plus its original upholstery, including the correct door panels, carpeting, and headliner.
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About the author: Sergiu Tudose
Sergiu Tudose profile photo

Sergiu got to experience both American and European car "scenes" at an early age (his father drove a Ford Fiesta XR2 supermini in the 80s). After spending over 15 years at local and international auto publications, he's starting to appreciate comfort behind the wheel more than raw power and acceleration.
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