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Golf 7 R Gets 3.6L Bi-Turbo V6 and RS3 Gearbox from HGP

People say that the 2.0-liter turbo in the Golf R is a sign that downsizing works since it's more powerful than a V6 and relatively lag-free. But what happens when you replaced that TSI engine with the 3.6-liter V6 from the old Passat?
Golf 7 R Gets 3.6L Bi-Turbo V6 and RS3 Gearbox from HGP 5 photos
Golf 7 R Gets 3.6L Bi-Turbo V6 and RS3 Gearbox from HGPGolf 7 R Gets 3.6L Bi-Turbo V6 and RS3 Gearbox from HGPGolf 7 R Gets 3.6L Bi-Turbo V6 and RS3 Gearbox from HGPGolf 7 R Gets 3.6L Bi-Turbo V6 and RS3 Gearbox from HGP
HGP motorsport is one of the few companies in the world that can do a bi-turbo V6 swap for the Golf. However, nearly every project until now has been based on the Golf 6 R because it's based on the PQ35 platform and thus compatible with the old Passat's V6 engine.

But HGP has recently stuffed a Golf 7 R with the 3.6-liter V6, and the result is bewildering. Nobody would ever know from looking at the exterior, but this 740+ horsepower, 925 Nm car could outrun most Ferraris.

The project isn't 100% complete, but it the Golf R36 can already go from 0 to 100 km/h in 3 seconds and reach 200 km/h in 8.9 seconds. Top speed? 330 km/h, limited by the durability of the drivetrain.

As is usually the case, the bi-turbo V6 requires an Audi RS3 gearbox with strengthened clutch pack because the one in the Golf R can only handle about 400 Nm of torque.

But unlike all previous projects, this one also needs complex wiring to be done, as the Golf 7 is a much newer car with different electronics. And because the MQB platform was never designed for this engine (except for the Atlas), none of the mounts match.

And in case you're wondering, HGP never makes engine swaps that need constant maintenance. It's reliable, silent when not thrashed and complies with all the German laws and regulations. You could hold a regular conversation with your significant other and when she starts nagging silence her with a mouthful of acceleration.

The only thing we don't get is why they went with dual exhaust tips. It gives it away as a custom car and might scare off a few supercar owners in the know. So without further ado, let's check out the world premier test drive of the first Golf 7 ever fitted with a 3.6-liter V6.

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