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GM Restarts Production Plant, Completes Trucks It Didn't Get to Finish

There were smiles and goodwill all around for the men and women of GM yesterday as America’s largest auto manufacturer announced it would be reopening key production facilities laid to waste by the global microchip shortage. Starting November 1st, a shred of normalcy will return to facilities left stuck in a state of limbo by the shortage.
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The first order of business upon returning to work will be to finish an order of Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra pickup trucks that had been left in various states of completion when the crisis shut the plant down indefinitely. Full-sized trucks have been the bread and butter of GM’s market share for decades. Now, it’s time to hunker down and get those delayed orders fulfilled.

The problem, of course, occurred because microchips have become a vital aspect of every modern vehicle. Everything from the radio to the satellite navigation to starting up the vehicle in the first place can’t be done without crucial silicone chips.

This notion applies not just to GM, but to every auto manufacturer on the planet. Some companies have fared better than others, but GM has undoubtedly been hurt badly by recent events.

GM plans to crank out the last of the 2021 model year vehicles before the end of the year, just in time to focus on the upcoming major refresh for both the Silverado and the Sierra. With substantial refreshes and improvements to both trucks inside and out, the chip shortage has ensured both will hit the market at significantly higher prices than in years before.

It’s a signal that automakers around the world are wounded by the chip shortage. It’s a cost that’s likely to be transferred onto the consumers, at least in the short term. All while the chip shortage continues to assault the industry with shortages and shutdowns galore.

 
 
 
 
 

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