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Futuri 900CR Is What Happens When a 1999 Ducati 900SS Grows Custom Horns
You might find this hard to believe, but Futuri is actually the work of a solo artist, whose workshop is a tiny shed in his backyard.

Futuri 900CR Is What Happens When a 1999 Ducati 900SS Grows Custom Horns

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It should go without saying that Pierre Terblanche designed some truly astounding machines during his career, but we wouldn’t refer to the 900SS iterations from the 1990s as his best efforts. Whereas masterpieces like Ducati’s Paul Smart 1000 LE or the special-edition MH900e captivated gearheads with their breathtaking aesthetics, the same can’t be said for the SuperSport variants in question.

However, there is a bright side to this whole ordeal. Given these bikes’ ugly duckling status, it’s easy for custom motorcycle builders to maintain a clear conscience as they modify the living hell out of them, and the final results are often mind-boggling! As time went by, we’ve examined several bespoke head-turners based on various models of the 900SS, including Lossa Engineering’s glamorous cafe racer and a scrambler-style ‘93 MY specimen from California’s Pista Design, to name but a couple.

Today, we’ll be discussing how a solo Dutch craftsman named Mark van Veggel took a factory-spec Ducati 900SS from bland to brutal. The fellow is a father of two and an IT technician by trade, with the art of motorcycle customization being his favorite pastime. Currently, Mark operates in a humble 97 square-foot (9 sqm) workspace, but he plans on moving to a bigger location in the near future.

The beast you’re seeing here is van Veggel’s very first undertaking of this magnitude, and it’s heavily inspired by NCT Motorcycles’ 750SS-based “Predator.” It all began when Mark stumbled upon a well-kept 1999 MY donor on the Facebook Marketplace, which was promptly acquired in exchange for a modest €1,500. As soon as the creature had been delivered, he kicked things off with an invigorating service in the powertrain department.

First things first, the valve clearances were carefully adjusted to bring about optimal performance, while the spark plugs and timing belts have been replaced with youthful substitutes. After treating the 904cc L-twin to some fresh oil, the project’s mastermind wanted to make sure that everything was running smoothly, so he took the SuperSport for a spin on a 90-mile (150-km) test ride. He returned feeling satisfied with the Duc’s behavior on the tarmac, and it was now time for the real modifications to commence in earnest.

For starters, Mark tweaked the subframe in order to achieve the desired proportions, then he busied himself with fabricating a unique license plate holder using steel tubes. The next stage of van Veggel’s makeover involved one of the must-have features he envisioned, namely a pie-cut exhaust system that’s been painstakingly manufactured from scratch. With all the pieces welded together, the new plumbing was heat-wrapped and topped with state-of-the-art Akrapovic mufflers.

The moto architect also felt that Ducati’s fiend was in need of a tougher riding posture, so he moved the foot pegs rearward to accomplish just that. In terms of bodywork, you will spot a fiberglass tail section with integrated LED lighting, which fits atop the reworked subframe like a glove. At the opposite pole, we’re greeted by what might just be the tiniest front fender in existence, bolted to the fork legs via bespoke mounting points.

Up top, we still find the stock fuel tank, but it’s been revised to sit lower on the frame rails, gripped by more one-off mounting hardware. A solo Alcantara-clad saddle – which features yellow stitching for contrast – can be seen taking pride of place in between the gas chamber and tail. Following the installation of a single-sided swingarm, Mark deemed it necessary to add a higher-spec drive chain and aftermarket sprockets.

Since IT is his line of business, you can probably imagine that there’s a fair bit of electronic wizardry going on here. A simplified wiring harness has been developed to link the electrical goodies to a custom ECU, and the whole shebang was topped with an assortment of bolt-on accessories, such as Motogadget’s digital Motoscope Pro gauge, LED turn signals and a premium headlight module.

On the other hand, the bulk of the internal electrics rests on a fiberglass tray, which is hidden underneath the gas tank. The bike’s cockpit comes equipped with a pair of clip-on handlebars, sporting new grips, bar-end mirrors and CNC-machined fluid reservoirs. To conclude his ravishing exploit in style, van Veggel enveloped the SuperSport’s attire in a stealthy gloss-black finish, while its trellis frame received a bright layer of yellow paintwork.

Last but not least, an array of striking decals have been conceptualized in Photoshop, then they were transferred onto this jaw-dropping spartan. Thus, the fourteen-month customization process reached its grand finale, and the titan was nicknamed Futuri 900CR as a nod to Mark’s attempt at creating a functional cryptocurrency, which occurred a few years back.

 
 
 
 
 

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