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France Bans the Sale of Any Gas or Diesel Vehicle Starting 2040

While some countries chose to withdraw from the 2015 Paris Agreement, others are taking bold measures to make sure they meet its targets, and also reduce pollution levels in their cities.
Renault TREZOR Concept 33 photos
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France's capital city is one of the top destinations for tourists anywhere in the world, and it's probably the place where the most marriage proposals have been uttered, but it's also quickly turning into one of Europe's most highly polluted urban areas.

The traffic is only partly to blame, but there is no doubt that reducing tailpipe emissions would make breathing a lot more pleasant for all the Parisians and the people visiting. Simple measures have already been taken, such as restricting the access of older diesel-powered cars, but that is not enough.

Indeed, the finger has been pointed at the proliferation of diesel engines in passenger cars, which are said to be responsible for spluttering a number of dangerous particles into the air, besides the well-known nitrous oxides. But the latest decision taken by the French government will affect more than just the oil burners.

Following the announcement made today by the Ecology Minister Nicolas Hulot, France becomes the first country to declare a ban on the sale of all fossil fuel-powered vehicles. The radical resolution will come into effect more than 22 years from now - in 2040 - but it nevertheless signals an unprecedented determination from the government of a country to tackle the issue like never before.

Other countries - such as Norway, for example - have similar targets, but they haven't outright announced any kind of bans. However, we expect others to follow in France's footsteps as the automotive industry and the entire world is getting ready for a new era in transportation, one that seems to rely on electric power more than anything.

Manufacturers are already taking huge strides in this direction, with Volvo being the latest to declare it would offer electric powertrains in all of its new models starting with 2019, be they plug-in hybrids or fully electric. Almost all other carmakers also have their ongoing electrification programs, but none have made such a clear and bold statement as Volvo yet.

According to the Daily Mail, the French Ecology Minister is aware it won't be an easy task for car manufacturers to make the necessary radical adjustments in time, but he didn't let that stop him. However, 2040 seems so far away that you can't help but feel a lot can happen until then.

 
 
 
 
 

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