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Ford Mustang Brand Manager Explains Why Mach 1 Doesn't Have a Shaker Hood

The Blue Oval rolled out the Mach 1 in 1969, and even back then, the shaker hood was “a very small take-rate option” according to Jim Owens. The Mustang brand manager is much obliged to explain why the 2021 model doesn’t have a retro hood scoop even as an option, and it all boils down to the location of the air intake.
2021 Ford Mustang Mach 1 34 photos
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Speaking to Ford Authority, Owens declared that “the Bullitt engine with the GT350 throttle body has the air vent in the upper right, so that would have been completely non-functional.” Instead of unnecessary garnish, the Blue Oval opted to focus R&D on the Mach 1’s handling to create “the best 5.0-liter lateral car we’ve ever done.”

Unveiled in June 2020, the limited-edition pony car features 22 percent more downforce than a GT Fastback with the Performance Pack Level 1. The downforce improvement jumps to approximately 150 percent if you also opt for the Handling Package. The corner-carving option is exclusively matched to the Tremec 3160 six-speed manual transmission, and it includes rear tire spats from the Shelby GT500.

Unique calibration for the magnetorheological dampers, a sharper steering system, stiffer sway bars and front springs, the brake booster from the Mustang GT Performance Pack Level 2, the rear toe-link from the Shelby GT500, and a stiffer steering I-shaft also need to be mentioned. To enhance endurance on track days, Ford has also added two side heat exchangers to cool the engine and tranny oil.

As for the free-breathing DOHC V8 hiding under the hood, well, the output figures perfectly match those of the limited-edition Bullitt. 480 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 420 pound-feet (568 Nm) of torque at 4,600 rpm are enough to reach 60 miles per hour (96 kph) in 4.2 seconds from a standstill. According to Ford, the quarter-mile run is over in 12.2 seconds.

“This is one of those special Mustangs that truly brings a smile to the faces of our owners, enthusiasts, and fans – including me – so there’s never been a better time to bring back the Mach 1 and have it go global too,” said head honcho Jim Farley.

 
 
 
 
 

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