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Fiberglass armadillo Camper Is a Flagship for Ultimate Resistance to the Off-Grid World
Let's be honest; you don't need some massive mobile unit to live a life worth living off-grid. Heck, according to Armadillo Trailers, it doesn't even need to be extremely expensive. After all, the flagship we'll be diving into today will run you as little as $26,500.

Fiberglass armadillo Camper Is a Flagship for Ultimate Resistance to the Off-Grid World

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Folks, I recently discovered a crew from out in British Columbia dubbed Armadillo Trailers. While a camper company from Canada is nothing new, what's rather neat about this crew is that they focus their attention on a particular building process, one that results in roomy, capable, and mobile trailers built to sustain life off-road, on-road, or off-grid.

What makes this team so dang special is that they seem to be bringing back a particular style of camper, Trilliums or Bolers, characterized by a two-piece fiberglass shell that appears to be bulletproof. Heck, reports exist of this style of camper lasting even more than 50 years. That alone is worth the $33,900 Canadian ($26,500 American at current exchange rates) for one of these flagships.

As for the camper in question today, its name resonates with that of the company in that it's also called the armadillo (not with a capital A). Just as I mentioned that this manufacturer builds these campers in a particular style, the armadillo, too, is created out of fiberglass using two halves that are bonded together to yield a travel trailer that is weather and pest-proof. Heck, there isn't much that can eat away fiberglass.

Let's pretend you just purchased one of these machines for your subsequent adventures. Once you've hitched up all 1,800 pounds (816 kilograms) of UVW and thrown on your gear, up to a GVWR of 2,700 pounds (1,225 kilograms), you should be ready for whatever the road ahead throws at you. A torsion axle rated up to 3,500 pounds (1,588 kilograms), electric brakes, and rock guards should work wonders even if you decide to take things off the pavement. Do make sure you have the proper tires for such ventures.

After arriving at your campsite, you'll be able to unfurl things like awnings, dismount your bikes from their rack, and set up the outdoor shower and mobile galley if you brought one along. Don't worry; the interior has a place for you to cook your meals, but nothing beats grilled mackerel and veggies on an open fire.

To help you stay alive while out in the middle of nowhere, folding solar panels on the roof will be processing power and diverting it to batteries, and a freshwater tank of 10.8 gallons (49 liters) should suffice for a couple of days or so. If you need more water, there's plenty of exterior storage to bring more. Gas cans can also be brought along, up to two 20-pound (9.1-kilogram)buggers.

All that's nice and all, but what about the interior of this RV? What I found rather neat is the amount of people you can sleep in one of these campers. Although it appears to be relatively small, at both ends of the armadillo, sleeping spaces for up to four people can be found. Sure, one of them is a modular dinette, but the result is the same. The rest of the space is reserved for the interior galley I mentioned and countertop space. Oh, nearly forgot all about the overhead storage.

There's just one downside to this sleek and roomy camper; there's no interior bathroom. A porta potty is your best bet, coupled with the exterior shower I mentioned. However, if you want to get your hands on such a camper, just tell Armadillo that you'd like to eliminate a bed and install a shower; they may be able to make that happen; it'll cost extra for sure.

Now, I'd love to tell you all about all the little standard and extra goodies found in this camper, but that would require we be here for the next hour or so. However, you can always take matters into your own hands and see what sort of camper you can own for around $26,500 American.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.
Images in the gallery showcase an array of custom colors and interiors for the armadillo camper trailer.

 
 
 
 
 

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