autoevolution

Ferrari V6 Incoming, Expected With Up To 723 HP

If you search for V6 engines that Ferrari used to produce in the not-so-distant past, Wikipedia reveals that production models with six cylinders from the Prancing Horse stopped production in the 1970s. The Dino engine was also used by Fiat and Lancia, but nevertheless, Ferrari doesn’t go lower than eight cylinders in this day and age.
Ferrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentation 13 photos
Ferrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentationFerrari Capital Markets Day 2018 presentation
Or does it? Alfa Romeo uses a 2.9-liter twin-turbo V6 in the Quadrifoglio versions of the Giulia and Stelvio. Coincidence or not, the 3.9-liter twin-turbo V8 in the California T has two more cylinders but the same V angle (90 degrees), bore (86.5 mm), and stroke (82 mm).

Test mules based on the 488 GTB were spied time and again, exhibiting six-cylinder exhaust sounds. Based on these bits of information, there’s no denying Ferrari is working towards bringing the V6 back into the range. As a matter of fact, the Prancing Horse confirmed a six-cylinder engine architecture in September 2018 but didn’t go into detail.

“If not Dino,”
the Ferrari with the all-new engine “could use the badge 486” according to Car Magazine. Sources close to the project claim the 2.9-liter twin-turbo V6 will be “available in two power outputs.” Without hybrid assistance, chances are the engine develops 610 bhp and 443 pound-feet (600 Nm). We’re more inclined to believe the British publication refers to 610 PS, translating to a little more than 600 horsepower.

“When equipped with plug-in hybrid technology,” the 2.9-liter twin-turbo V6 “is thought to be able to deliver as much as 723 bhp and nearly 800 lb-ft (1,085 Nm).” Once again, there’s something amiss with these figures if you convert the ponies into the metric system.

Looking at the bigger picture, there’s no denying Ferrari is developing the most performance-oriented V6 you’ll be capable of buying in a production car. Aston Martin has a six-cylinder engine with forced induction and hybrid assistance in the pipeline too, which goes to show that downsizing doesn’t necessarily mean boring.

On that note, care to guess how much Ford can squeeze out of the 3.5-liter EcoBoost? That would be 647 horsepower (656 PS) and 550 pound-feet (746 Nm) of torque, thank you!

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories