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Ferrari 250 GTO Crash At 2017 Goodwood Revival Looks Like An Expensive Mistake

As you all know, the 250 GTO isn’t only the most collectible Ferrari out there. It also holds the record for the most expensive car ever sold at auction, with chassis number 3851GT selling for $38,115,000 three years ago. 3851GT may be more special thanks to the 2nd place finish in the 1962 Tour de France, but 250 GTO Pininfarina Coupe chassis 4399GT is even rarer.
Ferrari 250 GTO Crash At 2017 Goodwood Revival 11 photos
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Owned by English businessman Anthony Bamford, this freshly crashed Pininfarina Coupe is the pride and joy of the chairman of construction equipment manufacturer JCB. 4399GT is the first 250 GTO converted with the distinctive body shell, and its original owner was Colonel Ronnie Hoare. After it was raced for a while, the car was converted for road use in 1965.

Bamford owns 4399GT since 1969, and he finished the car in the instantly recognizable red-and-blue color scheme in 1980. Since then, Bamford entered his 250 GTO Pininfarina Coupe in multiple vintage races, including the Goodwood Revival. This year’s edition didn’t fare well for the businessman or for the elected drivers: Andy Newall and Frank Stippler. 2016 Silverstone Classic winner Andy was behind the steering wheel when the crash happened.

Also known as the 250 GTO ’64 or Series II, only four examples of the Pininfarina Coupe have been produced. As you can see from the video, 4399GT isn’t totaled, but the damage translates to an expensive repair bill. But money isn’t the issue here. Nor it is the fact Bamford can’t drive the car for a while, chiefly because his collection includes a second 250 GTO.

It’s hard to tell if the attempt to pass that stupidly fast 250 LM on the track was worth it for the driver and Bamford, but then again, let’s all rejoice we haven’t lost a classic on this fateful day. On that note, did you know that there’s another gentleman who regularly races his 250 GTO ’64?


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