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Fantastic 1976 Chevrolet Monte Carlo Returns After 3 Decades in a Building

The Monte Carlo could be ordered in just two different versions called S and Landau, and both of them were available with V8 engines exclusively.
1976 Monte Carlo 15 photos
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Part of the second-generation lineup, the 1976 model year introduced several notable changes, starting with the standard engine. The new unit came in the form of a 305 (5.0-liter) with 140 horsepower, while the 350 (5.7-liter) 2-barrel and the 400 (6.6-liter) were both available as optional configurations.

The more powerful 454 (7.5-liter) V8 was no longer available, so the 400 was the biggest option that could be fitted from the factory on the 1976 Monte Carlo.

Someone in Columbia, Tennessee, has recently discovered a Monte Carlo in an impressive condition in a building where the car has been parked for the last 30 years.

Still coming as a project, this Chevy doesn’t look like it requires too much hard work. The engine and the transmission are no longer in the car, that’s true, but both are still available, and eBay seller fanmanran71 says absolutely all parts are there to put the car back together.

At first glance, this Monte Carlo looks like an easy project, especially given its solid condition. There’s no rust on this car, which is kind of surprising given it spent 30 years in hiding. Sure, some TLC is still needed, but the most urgent thing it seems to require is a thorough wash.

Finding such a solid Monte Carlo doesn’t happen too often, and given the original 350 is still around, restoring the car to factory specifications is likely an easy father-son project.

Unfortunately, it also seems to be an expensive project, as the top bid on eBay right now is yet to unlock the reserve. In other words, the Internet must do better than $3,000 to be able to take the car home, with the seller not sharing any information on the value of the reserve.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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