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Everybody Wants To Know How Long Can Electric Vehicles Batteries Last

Electric vehicles are more popular than ever, but this is not nearly enough for large-scale adoption. Many people still question whether Li-Ion batteries that power EVs are durable enough and what happens after they no longer can hold the charge. The simple answers are yes and we’ll see, although it is much more complicated than this.
How long can electric vehicles batteries last 8 photos
Li-Ion batteries in electric vehicles will last a lot longerLi-Ion batteries in electric vehicles will last a lot longerLi-Ion batteries in electric vehicles will last a lot longerLi-Ion batteries in electric vehicles will last a lot longerLi-Ion batteries in electric vehicles will last a lot longerLi-Ion batteries in electric vehicles will last a lot longerLi-Ion batteries in electric vehicles will last a lot longer
Although more and more people buy electric vehicles these days, the vast majority of Americans still don’t want an EV. This was revealed in a recent Deloitte study, where only 5% of those questioned indicated that their next ride would be battery-powered. While 22% were open to some sort of electrification, a full 69% of the Americans will buy a diesel or a gasoline vehicle, period.

Among the reasons that prevent more people to consider going electric, the study mentions range anxiety and the lack of confidence in Li-Ion batteries' durability. Combined with the huge costs of replacing them if anything goes wrong, this is what’s keeping lots of people from even considering buying an EV. So, many want to know how long can an EV battery last, after all.

There is no doubt, the Li-Ion battery is the most important (and expensive) part of any electric car. Even so, owners should not worry about the battery’s durability. Most of them are designed to be robust enough to last for the serviceable life of the vehicle. Of course, many variables can influence the lifespan of a Li-Ion battery, but real-life evidence shows many Evs can cover well above 200,000 miles (322,000 km). This is comparable with the normal life of an ICE vehicle.

To offer some deserved peace of mind, all EV manufacturers offer a separate battery warranty that lasts longer than the regular vehicle warranty. Typically, this is around eight years or 100,000 miles (161,000 km) and covers a replacement in the case of a complete failure. Normal battery wear and tear is not covered unless the battery has lost more than 30% of its original capacity within the warranty period. It’s important to know that most warranties are transferable to new owners when the car is sold.

Of course, the battery will still lose capacity over time and, in the case of some vehicles that cover huge distances, it might prompt a battery change at some point. In that case, depending on the make and model, the bill could be anywhere between $10,000 and $30,000. The price of EV batteries has gone down a lot in the past years and it will probably continue to fall in the future. Even so, the cost of changing the battery is well below the price of a new car, so it might be worth considering keeping the EV nevertheless.

 
 
 
 
 

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