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EV-Converted Porsche 914 Uses Household Hair Dryers as Cabin Heaters

Now that Porsche has announced its intention to go electric with the Mission E, those who already drive around in EV Porsches have something new to talk about. What do you mean there are no electron juice-powered Porsches out there for now?
EV Porsche 914 1 photo
You need look no further than the EV conversion market to find these cars. Nevertheless, some of the contraptions are more elaborate than others and we're here to talk about one that doesn't exactly fall in line with Zuffenhausen's obsession for precise engineering.

Spotted at a Cars and Cofee event by Internet-famous enthusiasts Jonsibal, the Porsche 914 we have here comes with a little surprise in the HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) area.

As you can see in the pic above, the owner decided to compensate for the lack of heat generated by the internal combustion engine that used to occupy the middle of the car through the use of... household hair dryers. Yep, whenever you want to drive with that targa top off and avoid letting the weather get to you, a pair of dryers will cater to your needs.

While the bathroom engineering seen here is nothing to be proud of, you should know a few things before throwing rotten tomatoes at this car for its electric side.

For one thing, the 914 is the easiest financial path to the Porsche world, so you'll find tons of these around. In fact, if you're looking to grab one "in need of a restoration" for a project such as this one, five grand might just be enough for the vehicle itself.

Since the 914 was a VW-Porsche project launched in the late 60s, the cheap cars come with a VW flat-four. If you're lucky, though, you can find 914s motivated by Porsche flat-sixes.

People seem to have developed a bit of an obsession for mounting battery packs in the nose of the 914, but the EV conversion kits aren't exactly cheap.

While there's no official pricing on this, most such jobs have cost anywhere between $10,000 and $30,000, depending on the complexity of the job.

If you happen to meet the owner of such a car, chances are the guy/gal in the driver's seat is also the one who worked on the conversion. There are obviously exceptions, but we don't expect the driver of this car to be one of them.

P.S.: We've added a video of another electric 914 doing a burnout. Because green transportation.

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