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Elon Musk Opens First European Plant, Says Random Diesel Tests Should Be Next

Perhaps Tesla Motors’ CEO was simply too excited about the inauguration of the company’s first European factory, the other day. Or maybe Elon Musk has a point. Whatever the case may be, you have to admit a random testing of diesel cars – no matter who the carmaker is – would be an intelligent move for environmental regulators.
First Tesla plant in Europe opens in Tilburg, the Netherlands 6 photos
First Tesla plant in Europe opens in Tilburg, the NetherlandsFirst Tesla plant in Europe opens in Tilburg, the NetherlandsFirst Tesla plant in Europe opens in Tilburg, the NetherlandsFirst Tesla plant in Europe opens in Tilburg, the NetherlandsFirst Tesla plant in Europe opens in Tilburg, the Netherlands
Sure, such a move would imply big resources and a joint effort involving both the European and the U.S. environmental agencies, a common venture in which several countries would work together. It sounds like a significant shot history has rarely shown happens, but let us just act it would be possible for a change.

For starters, we have a slight feeling Volkswagen wouldn’t be the only carmaker involved. As a matter of fact, unconfirmed rumors claimed more automakers sell vehicles that exceed the European limit for air pollution, an accusation giants like BMW have already officially declined.

"The obvious move is to pick cars at random and then test the emission in transit," said Musk at the unveiling of the US-based electrical carmaker's new plant in the Netherlands, according to AFP. Tesla Motors CEO believes the German car giant was under a lot of pressure to make improvements in emission levels and ran into a physical wall.

It should be noted that Musk’s statements – as much as they make sense to everybody – come at a time when EV makers could use diseselgate in their own interest, offering electric-powered cars as a much better alternative to diesel vehicles.

Moreover, as we mentioned, the eco-conscious billionaire, who once said nuking Mars would make it habitable, just witnessed the opening of Europe’s first Tesla factory in Tilburg, in the southern Netherlands.

More European plants to follow


Speaking of the new factory, the plant is the first fully-fledged outside its home market and, according to the Financial Times, it was built using old factory parts from the company’s main factory in Fremont, California. The plant is set to make 450 Tesla Model S cars per week, with a capacity for about 1,000 a week.

The plant in Tilburg is not entirely new, more likely a reconfiguration and upgrade if you wish, considering it was previously used to reassemble cars made in California. The premium EV maker said the new Tesla Tilburg factory is here to bring their most popular model faster to “our growing family in Europe.”

Furthermore, according to the source, Elon Musk said that the plant has “a lot of room for growth and expansion,” adding that the company was likely to look for new sites in Europe, starting next year.




 
 
 
 
 

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