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Eccentric Car Collector Wanted for $13 Million Converted Cold War Bunker
Mansions are so yesterday. Why buy what every other millionaire or billionaire is getting, when you could get something with an extra layer of protection for yourself, your family and your car collection.

Eccentric Car Collector Wanted for $13 Million Converted Cold War Bunker

Seafield House is a converted Cold War bunker that would be perfect for a car collector with $13 million to spendSeafield House is a converted Cold War bunker that would be perfect for a car collector with $13 million to spendSeafield House is a converted Cold War bunker that would be perfect for a car collector with $13 million to spendSeafield House is a converted Cold War bunker that would be perfect for a car collector with $13 million to spendSeafield House is a converted Cold War bunker that would be perfect for a car collector with $13 million to spendSeafield House is a converted Cold War bunker that would be perfect for a car collector with $13 million to spendSeafield House is a converted Cold War bunker that would be perfect for a car collector with $13 million to spendThe Cold War bunker before it became Seafield HouseThe Cold War bunker before it became Seafield HouseThe Cold War bunker before it became Seafield House
A Cold War bunker would be just the thing, and you’re in luck, because one is on the market right now. As long as you don’t mind living in the middle of nowhere – but close enough to reach London by car.

On a more serious note, the premium real estate market has seen an uptick in demand for converted bunkers and shelters, as some of the most panicky one-percenters are looking for options in case 2020 turns out to really be the worst year ever. This is also one of these pieces of property, but it can double as a comfortable and highly luxurious family home, just waiting for right new owner.

It could be a car collector, looking to stash some of his most prized assets in safety. Or it could be a playboy, young or old, or a celebrity or a businessman with something to hide. It could be anyone with £10 million ($13.2 million) to spare and the desire to move to the UK.

Buyer categories anticipated; secretive businessman, celebrity avoiding paparazzi, young or old playboy, trophy hoarder, car collector, original thinker, eccentric intellectual,” the owner writes in the listing with F.W. GAPP.

For this kind of money, the new owner would get the ideal “pandemic refuge.” “5 foot [152.4-cm] steel reinforced concrete structure set in 1.5 acres and invisible from all vantage points. No neighbors on any boundary. Located in a dull north west London suburb with nothing on offer but; 8 miles to central London, Mill Hill School, close to Waitrose, one fine restaurant.”

You have to appreciate millionaires with a sense of humor.

That said, the place is called Seafield House and is a converted Cold War bunker. Originally built in the 1950s as a war room or command center, it was part of a military installation and was supposed to shield military commanders from the exterior in case of a nuclear attack. It had accommodation for up to 50 staff indoors, though not of the kind or level or comfort offered today, along with communications rooms and a ventilation system to keep radioactive air out.

The place fell into disrepair and was eventually redesigned by London architect Dan Smith. “The whole idea was to create an architecture of life from the architecture of death, because it was all about nuclear holocaust and a sort of Dr. Strangelove scenario,” Smith said a while back, describing the bunker as a sort of windowless tomb, when it was first listed for sale at more than half the current price.

Thanks to Smith’s work, Seafield House is now a 6-bedroom, 6-bathroom luxury mansion with its own indoor pool, spa and massage room, a cinema, a study and an underground garage for 6 vehicles. The owner can park another 12 cars in the parking lot in the driveway outside, but must keep his fingers crossed for them in case the end of days comes. There’s also a studio, 2 well-appointed kitchens and two separate dressing rooms attached to the master bedroom.

With a total of 10,000 square-feet (929 square meters) of living space and two floors, Seafield House is a combination of modern design and James Bond-like levels of coolness. It stands out for several open spaces, expansive glazing, and relaxation areas worthy of a true spa place, all of them in sharp contrast with the boxy shape and the electric gates enclosing the gardens.

The converted bunker is being sold as a “complete one-off,” which is an incredibly accurate phrase considering its history. The gallery includes several photos from the real estate agency and some pre-conversion pics, just to show you the kind of work that went into turning this nuclear shelter into a 007-type of residence.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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