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E 63 AMG S-Model Estate Reviewed by Auto Express

Even though Mercedes-Benz is too lazy to modify the 4Matic all-wheel drive system for the newly-introduced S-versions of its AMG models to correspond to right hand drive markets, they aren't lazy enough to sell the rear-wheel drive versions in those markets.
Mercedes-Benz E 63 AMG S-Model Estate 19 photos
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AutoExpress, for example, decided to test drive the fastest wagon that Mercedes-Benz has ever built, so they went straight for the E 63 AMG S-Model Estate.

Unfortunately, the lack of all-wheel drive - like in all left-hand drive markets – doesn't transform the 585 hp (577 bhp) wagon into a much more insane car, since that power is just 28 hp (27 bhp) more than the Performance Package version of the non-facelift E 63 AMG.

With 4Matic all-wheel drive at least it would have dropped its acceleration time in sub-Audi RS6 territory, which this rear-wheel drive variant doesn't, even though it is much more powerful.

As you probably know already, the M157 twin-turbocharged V8 in the E 63 AMG S-Model delivers 585 hp (577 bhp) and an Earth-moving 800 Nm (590 lb ft) of torque. With all the downsides caused by the lack of four-wheel drive to put all this power down more efficiently, AutoExpress seem pretty impressed with the car, but you should check out their review for yourself.

 
 
 
 
 

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