autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

Ducati Monster 1100 Evo Gets the Custom Treatment, "Monstrosity" Is Born

Sure enough, a 996’s fuel tank looks right at home on this rolling masterpiece.
Monstrosity 9 photos
MonstrosityMonstrosityMonstrosityMonstrosityMonstrosityMonstrosityMonstrosityMonstrosity
Marc Roissetter is an ambitious moto enthusiast that goes about his daily business in the United Arab Emirates. The art of motorcycle customization just so happens to be among this fellow’s numerous hobbies, and the venture we’ll be looking at today does a sweet job at demonstrating his remarkable abilities.

I’ll tell you what; let’s take a second to examine what’s at hand here. The donor for this project was a 2012 model in Ducati’s Monster 1100 Evo lineup – a remarkable piece of Italian machinery with some serious oomph on tap. This nasty animal is brought to life by an air-cooled L-twin leviathan that prides itself with four desmodromic valves and a healthy displacement of 1,078 cc.

At 7,500 rpm, the powerplant is fully capable of generating as much as 100 hp, while a torque output of 76 pound-feet (103 Nm) will be accomplished at around 6,000 revs. Ultimately, this whole shebang leads to a 0-62 mph (0-100 kph) acceleration time of just 3.6 seconds. Furthermore, Ducati’s behemoth is blessed with a generous top speed of 140 mph (225 kph).

As to Roissetter’s one-off masterpiece, he appropriately nicknamed it the Monstrosity. For starters, the moto artist stripped away each and every stock body panel to make way for an assortment of custom alternatives. The bike’s standard gas tank was replaced by a Ducati 996’s module, and the factory subframe was discarded in favor of a bespoke counterpart.

Additionally, a unique triple clamp was fabricated in-house and equipped onto the Monstrosity’s front end, along with a new headlight bracket and a pair of aftermarket clip-on handlebars that contribute to achieving a meaner riding stance. Last but not least, the entire machine was rewired using state-of-the-art electricals, while its damaged L-twin mill was subjected to a comprehensive rebuild to have everything running smoothly.

Long story short, Marc Roissetter’s Monstrosity is a bare-bones colossus that manages to keep the retro spirit shining for the world to behold.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories