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DR Moto Yamaha R1 Is a MotoGP-Class Bike You Can Actually Get

Just how many times have you thought about riding a MotoGP-like bike? Now, for most of us, this is never going to happen, unless we come across a hefty sum of money and bid on, say, Colin Edwards’ prototype. Or just get ready to write a hefty check and head over to Reynolds Engineering, and ask Dean Reynolds for a bike.
DR Moto MotoGP-spec Yamaha R1 16 photos
Photo: Reynolds Engineering
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Dean, the man behind UK-based Reynolds Engineering has worked for quite a long time for BSB, WSBK, Moto2 and MotoGp teams, so you can imagine he knows his way around. A long-time MotoGP enthusiast, Dean set out to create a bike worthy to take a place on the premier class grid, and after 2 years of hard work, the DR Moto is ready and up for grabs, if the £89,500 (€111,900 or $148,400) invoice does not scare you away.

The DR Moto is built around a 200+ hp (at the wheel) Yamaha R1-derived engine mated to a Nova close ratio gearbox, loaded into a custom-built aluminium beam frame. The man in charge of the chassis is Barry Ward, who was Kenny Roberts’ MotoGP technician back in the day. The fairing is all carbon fiber, as you’ve probably guessed already, crafted to MotoGP specifications.

16.5" Marchesini forged magnesium rims have been loaded on the DR Moto, complete with 4-piston monoblock Brembo calipers with optional 320mm carbon disc brakes. In the rear, a Brembo 2-pot billet caliper squeezes a 160mm steel disc. The fork is a MotoGP-spec Ohlins FG 386 CRT unit, with CNC machined magnesium yokes which also have a built-in adjustable trail system.

The swingarm is CNC machined aluminium with an upside down architecture, also built to MotoGP specs. The stiffness of the swingarm is also adjustable for fine tune-up for various riders and tires. An Ohlins TTX36 MotoGP-spec shock was used for the racing-focused progressive linkage assembly.
DR Moto’s brain is a Motec M800 unit, and the bike also comes with traction control, an anti-wheelie function, and clutchless shifting. Ride-by-wire is of course standard, but the GPS tracking is an option. Dean Reynolds has more in store for the DR Moto, so you can ask him for pretty much anything you want. He’ll name the price and you’ll see how far you want to go.

For more inquiries and how to buy the DR Moto, check with the Reynolds Engineering webpage directly.

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