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Dodge Charger SXT Turns Into an SRT With Aftermarket Bumpers, Side Skirts, Hood

Now available to order from $29,995 excluding destination charge, the Charger SXT is pretty good value for the money. However, the full-size sedan in this specification is a bit lacking from an aesthetic standpoint.
Dodge Charger Full Conversion from SXT to SRT | Installation 12 photos
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Other than the cool signature lighting and crosshair grille, you can barely call it a muscle car. The closest trim level to be worthy of this description is the R/T, but the Scat Pack is the one you want, thanks to a more aggressive front-end design that features two nostrils right next to the headlights.

Some people, however, don’t want a thirsty HEMI V8 engine under the hood. This is where aftermarket company Vicrez enters the scene with a plethora of components that cost a lot less than OEM parts from the dealer.

More to the point, these guys are selling Scat Pack-style front and rear bumpers at $1,286.89, excluding shipping. Side skirts add $199.99 to the tally, and you can improve the makeover with Demon-inspired fender flares for $749. A Hellcat-style hood with a scoop and two heat extractors is available at $825.53, and of course, these components come unpainted.

The injection-molded parts were designed using 3D geometry CAD data in order to ensure precise fitment, but you’ll be the judge of that after watching the following video. Made from polypropylene, polyurethane, or aluminum, the components promise OEM levels of quality and durability.

I wouldn’t hold my breath if I were you, though. Fiat Chrysler Automobiles was never a byword for quality and durability, and I can’t imagine the aftermarket doing better than an automaker at a fraction of the cost.

Glancing over the Vicrez catalog for the Charger, you will also find a few mods that have no place on a modern car. The rear-window louvers, for example, spoil the looks a lot. As for the carbon-fiber steering wheel with LEDs and an integrated display, do you really need that kind of upgrade in combination with the Pentastar V6 of the SXT and the TorqueFlite transmission?



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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