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Dodge Challenger "Daytona" Looks Ready To Sprint

As those of you who are tuned into our Speed Shot tales (there's a tag for that below) might have noticed, the 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona has received extra pixel attention this season. So how about a classic Challenger that goes for the massive wing approach, albeit in rendering form?
Dodge Challenger "Daytona" rendering 6 photos
Dodge Challenger "Daytona" renderingDodge Challenger "Daytona" renderingDodge Challenger "Daytona" renderingDodge Challenger "Daytona" renderingDodge Challenger "Daytona" rendering
For starters, the (extra) reason the Charger Daytona enjoys the stage these days has to do with the fact that March 24 marked the 50th anniversary of when legendary engineer Larry Rathgeb and his Chrysler team, who created the classic Mopar machine, placed this in the hands of Buddy Baker, who set a world record for a closed circuit by hitting 200 mph.

Alas, Rathgeb, who achieved the said feat by using aerodynamics in an era when muscle was everything, went to motoring heaven just two days before the said date, following a battle with the current health crisis. Nevertheless, his achievements continue to inspire aficionados across the world and here we are, talking about them.

As mentioned in the intro, we've featured multiple renderings the portray the classic Dodge in post-modern form, so we can now talk about this Challenger effort, which comes from a digital label called Mrsingh Build.

We're looking at a 1970 model, albeit with this having come a long way from the factory look we've all enjoyed in Vanishing Point.

While the high-as-the-sky wing speaks for itself, this virtual build seems to favor aesthetics over everything else - the said downforce hardware is mixed with the type of wheel/tire setup normally seen in drag cars.

Looking past the said aspect, the blower and its hat protrude through the hood, penetrating the black stripes running the entire length of the muscle car. Oh, and let's not forget those side skirt extension-style exhaust tips, which make for a special approach (watch your legs as you exit that car, though!).

For the record, this isn't the most unusual Daytona makeover we've discussed, with that title probably going to this 911.



 

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