autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

Dieselgate-Affected Volkswagen Owners Warned By Judge Not To Part Out Their Cars

Volkswagen’s Dieselgate led to many awkward situations in the past year, and it keeps providing new stories for everyone.
Dismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI that got its buyback delayed 11 photos
Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being parted outDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerDismantled Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI before being turned in to the dealerConversation with VW representative regarding trading in a Volkswagen Golf TDI for Dieselgate settlementConversation with VW representative regarding trading in a Volkswagen Golf TDI for Dieselgate settlement
The latest involves the buyback process, which was supposed to be an open-and-shut case. However, it did not work out that way, because humans will be humans, and someone will think about a solution to get “something on the side,” on top of the regular settlement deal.

The extra “something” we are referring comes in the form of money, which could have been obtained by parting out Volkswagen and Audi cars with 2.0-liter TDI engines before handing them back to the dealer for the buyback process.

As we have stated before, it might have been all right to replace a nice set of alloys with “steelies,” but going overboard and dismantling the car to a running shell is too much.

As some of you already know, a man from Cincinnati stripped out his 2010 Volkswagen Golf VI 2.0 TDI, and he posted an ad online for the parts that he took off the vehicle. The situation was then picked up by several outlets, and he eventually got a call from a Volkswagen representative, who told Mr. Joe Mayer that his appointment had been delayed.

The event did not go unnoticed by the authorities and Volkswagen’s legal representatives, who have presented a point of view that is more than reasonable on this subject.

For example, Robert Giuffra, one attorney representing Volkswagen, has stated that the man from Cincinnati that has taken “almost every part” from his Golf VI 2.0 TDI has “gone too far,” and continued to underline the fact that owners should not “be engaging in deliberate parts stripping.”

In response to VW’s lawyer, U.S. District Court Judge Charles Breyer has responded that he “would echo that.” He also said that the “purpose of the agreement by Volkswagen was to accept those cars in the situation that they were in as they were driven on the road,” and not to strip the cars.”The same Federal judge warned Volkswagen owners to have “a word of caution” on the matter, USA Today notes.

If you ask us, it was wrong of the client from Cincinnati to attempt to sell Volkswagen a vehicle that he dismantled to its bare body. That kind of action is unfair on his behalf, and bragging about doing it did not help his cause. Regardless, we would not have imagined that the trade-in would have gone through even if he hadn’t shown off online.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories