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Custom Yamaha XSR900 Chimera Demonstrates How a Less-Is-More Approach Can Work Miracles

We rarely see a modified machine that keeps the OEM saddle in play, but it only makes sense to retain it if it fits the aesthetic you’re going for, right?
Yamaha XSR900 Chimera 15 photos
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Can and Mert Uzer of Bunker Custom Cycles have never been afraid to push boundaries on their builds, but any bike-modding guru likes to exercise restraint every now and again. With that being said, we have the pleasure of introducing you to Chimera – a ravishing XSR900 crafted by the Uzer brothers for Yamaha’s Yard Built initiative.

Low-key yet effective adjustments are the name of the game here, and the most noticeable of them is a three-piece fuel tank cover made of carbon fiber. Bunker used CNC-machined molds to give each panel the desired shape, then they assembled them into a single unit that attaches to the original mounting points on the frame. Interestingly enough, Can and Mert decided to retain the XSR’s standard saddle.

Most custom projects’ first priority is to ditch the stock seat,” they explain. “This time it's the other way around. By redesigning the tank but keeping the seat stock we wanted to show how easily one can transform the XSR900 into something completely unique.” The donor’s clunky license plate holder was promptly deleted, however, as were its rear lighting modules and fender.

In their stead, you will now find a flush-mounted LED taillight and a much slimmer bracket for the license plate, along with an aluminum cover that enshrouds the underside of the subframe. Two fenders can be seen at the front end; one sitting up high while the other is perched right above the motorcycle’s wheel. The stock headlight bucket was retained, but it’s been fitted with aftermarket LED internals and bespoke aluminum brackets.

Additional stopping power gets summoned through a trio of floating wave rotors from EBC, and ample grip is provided by Anlas Capra RD tires. The Chimera exhales through a complete SC-Project exhaust, which terminates on the right-hand side of its swingarm. After they’d installed a set of aluminum radiator covers built in-house, Bunker’s moto architects finished things off with a sexy color scheme that draws your attention straight to the gas tank.

 
 
 
 
 

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