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Custom Triumph Bonneville HotRod Looks Exceptional Dressed in Scalloped Paintwork

From a cosmetic standpoint, just about everything on this motorcycle screams “antique.”
Triumph Bonneville HotRod 13 photos
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Daniel Cabral and Pedro Oliveira of Ton-Up Garage are a bit of a dream team, always complementing one another’s abilities with masterful proficiency. Their lengthy portfolio of custom projects is teeming with builds that can make you go weak at the knees, and no two entities are even remotely alike!

Based on a 2006 variant of Triumph’s Bonneville family, the bike you’re looking at here is a stylistic nod to SoCal’s early hotrod scene. Daniel and Pedro began by discarding the factory bodywork in its entirety, thus making room for a bespoke outfit that’s been painstakingly fabricated in-house.

The centerpiece of this new attire is a tailor-made gas tank, proudly sporting a scalloped black and white color scheme. At the rear end, Ton-Up's showstopper features bespoke seat upholstery, a minute tail section, and LED lighting, all of which are held in place by a looped subframe. Underneath the new leather saddle, there's an inconspicuous tray housing the motorcycle's wiring and a lithium-ion battery.

Glancing at the cockpit, we notice custom switchgear, tank-mounted Motogadget instrumentation, and an unconventional handlebar. This module comes equipped with CNC-machined grips and bar-end turn signals, as well as a classy pair of minimalistic control levers. To further enforce the clutter-free appearance, the Portuguese specialists topped things off with a keyless RFID ignition.

Ton-Up modified the Bonneville’s suspension using higher-spec Ohlins fork internals up front and progressive shocks with preload adjustability at six o’clock. One-off fenders and laced 18-inch wheels can be spotted on both ends, with the latter wearing Firestone Deluxe Champion rubber.

Opting to leave the engine internals untouched, the guys limited their powertrain mods to stainless-steel exhaust plumbing and a set of premium velocity stacks. Lastly, front-end illumination is provided by a retro-style headlamp, and the flanks carry rear-mounted foot controls with serrated pegs. Once the project was complete, the authors nicknamed it HotRod in keeping with the chosen theme.

 
 
 
 
 

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