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Custom Triumph Bobber Basse-Bodeux Is Slammed, Stretched, and Astoundingly Good-Looking
Modified two-wheelers with elongated rear geometries tend to look obnoxious, but this is obviously an exception.

Custom Triumph Bobber Basse-Bodeux Is Slammed, Stretched, and Astoundingly Good-Looking

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We wouldn’t exactly refer to Fred “Krugger” Bertrand as a custom motorcycle builder because the man is more of an outright architect! Now aged 52, Fred grew up in the picturesque Belgian city of Malmedy, and his parents were avid motorsport enthusiasts, which might explain why he’d always been so fond of anything with wheels and an engine.

Taking part in national motocross competitions during his teenage years, Monsieur Bertrand studied electromechanics before enrolling in a coachbuilding apprenticeship at 20 years old. He’d raced in both rallies and touring car championships later on, simultaneously kicking off his career in the automotive industry with Renault. Once his second child was born, however, Fred began to ponder how he could allocate more time for his family.

He decided to make use of all the experience and fabrication knowledge previously gained, founding his own motorcycle maintenance, servicing, and customization outfit in 2002. Sure enough, it wasn’t long before Krugger’s work caught the attention of bike-modding enthusiasts and the press, with extensive (and well-deserved) praise coming from every direction.

The AMD World Championship saw Fred on the podium as many as four times, taking first place on two of these occasions. Now, the slammed Bonneville Bobber we’re about to look at (aka Basse-Bodeux) isn’t among the entities that wowed the crowd at AMD, but it’s arguably just as spectacular! Commissioned by Triumph Benelux, this mean machine is all about clean lines and a posture infused with drag bike vibes.

Although it’s rather toned-down by Krugger’s standards, the transformation still goes far beyond your run-of-the-mill custom venture. With the donor on the workbench, Fred proceeded to remove about an inch (25 mm) of height from its standard forks in order to achieve a lower stance. Then, he discreetly adjusted the OEM gas tank to make it look cleaner and crouched further down on the frame.

An auxiliary tank lies hidden beneath the seat, hosting the fuel pump and increasing capacity to 4.2 gallons (16 liters). The gorgeous saddle perched above uses the stock seat pan, but it’s been reupholstered in black leather of the highest quality. Even though these mods are all exceedingly cool, what really caught our attention is the Bobber’s revised rear framework.

Bertrand got rid of the cantilever shock absorber and installed a hardtail structure that lengthens the wheelbase by approximately three inches (75 mm). Next, the bike’s airbox got replaced with bespoke velocity stacks, enabling him to move its factory side panels a little further back. Custom-made fenders complete the bodywork, which was wrapped in a Seda Steel finish from Skoda’s color palette and topped with Neoprene badges.

Furthermore, one may find an aftermarket exhaust made of stainless steel, with pipes measuring 2.1 inches (53 mm) in diameter. In order for its 1,200cc parallel-twin engine to play nicely with the modified plumbing, the Basse-Bodeux has also been subjected to a comprehensive session of dyno tuning.

The motorcycle’s original hoops were rather stunning, yet Krugger decided to have them removed in favor of 18-inch alloy substitutes from Arlen Ness. This brand’s catalog was the source of those snazzy brake rotors, too, and ample grip is provided by a premium pair of Dunlop Sportmax tires. With all the aforementioned goodies in place, Fred moved on to the final touches.

He fitted an LED headlight at the front end, subsequently inverting the Bonneville Bobber’s handlebar to the cockpit’s profile nice and low. Lastly, new grips and unobtrusive bar-end turn signals finish things off, but there’s not a single mirror in sight. Although we haven’t seen the facial expressions of Triumph’s representatives upon meeting the Basse-Bodeux, it’s safe for us to assume they were seriously astonished.

 
 
 
 
 

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