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Custom Ducati 999 "Black Edition" Looks as If It Hails From the Darkest Pits of Hell

Some people might actually freak out when they see this predator on the streets at night.
Ducati 999 "Black Edition" 33 photos
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Most people wouldn’t dare to even think about customizing an esteemed Ducati 999 beyond the point of no return, but the Frenchmen over at Freeride Motos don’t seem to be that bothered. When a client crossed their doorstep to commission a project based on Bologna’s 900SS, Pierre Dhers and his crew suggested that the higher-spec 999 would be a more suitable candidate for the feat he had envisioned.

The customer decided to heed their advice and wasted no time searching for a befitting donor, which appeared in the form of a 2005 model from Ducati’s range. This brutal piece of machinery carries a liquid-cooled 998cc L-twin engine with 140 hp and 80 pound-feet (109 Nm) of torque at its disposal.

Before hitting a top speed of 165 mph (266 kph), the Duc will obliterate the quarter-mile jog in no more than eleven seconds flat. Now, let’s see how the Freeride pros went about transforming the '05 MY 999 into a custom masterpiece with sinister vibes, dubbed the "Black Edition." Aside from the bike’s fuel tank, every bit of factory bodywork has been removed, making room for bespoke alternatives.

Starting at the rear, we find an aluminum tail section with integrated LEDs sitting on top of a revised subframe, and the whole setup is accompanied by a handsome solo saddle. The creature’s front end is adorned with dual headlights and a tiny nose fairing, while a unique belly pan can be spotted in between the wheels.

We also see a premium selection of carbon fiber goodies, including new fenders, a stealthy chain guard, and a state-of-the-art EVR airbox. The latter is paired with a stainless-steel exhaust at the other end of the combustion cycle, and the original clutch mechanism has been discarded in favor of a CNC Racing module.

The French moto doctors fitted the titan’s suspension with top-shelf Ohlins hardware on both ends, then they’ve upgraded the brakes using Brembo goodies. Lastly, we arrive at the cockpit, where Dhers’ specialists installed Aviacompositi instrumentation and Renthal clip-ons, as well as Motogadget bar-end blinkers and a set of Domino grips.

 
 
 
 
 

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