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Custom-Built BMW R nineT Scrambler From JvB-Moto Can Turn Heads on Both Asphalt and Dirt
The handmade aluminum bodywork is obviously the star of the show here, and the process of crafting it took bucketloads of elbow grease.

Custom-Built BMW R nineT Scrambler From JvB-Moto Can Turn Heads on Both Asphalt and Dirt

Custom BMW R nineT ScramblerCustom BMW R nineT ScramblerCustom BMW R nineT ScramblerCustom BMW R nineT ScramblerCustom BMW R nineT ScramblerCustom BMW R nineT ScramblerCustom BMW R nineT ScramblerCustom BMW R nineT ScramblerCustom BMW R nineT ScramblerCustom BMW R nineT Scrambler
It’s difficult to overstate the sheer level of popularity that BMW Motorrad’s R nineT had gained in the bike-modding community. As a matter of fact, we reckon this nameplate will remain a top pick for custom motorcycle builders long after production ceases – not that we’d want to see the nineT getting the ax anytime soon, though!

With plenty of power provided by its 1,170cc boxer-twin and an anatomy ripe for customization, the revered R nineT is to workshops what the Mazda Miata is to folks who need the perfect project car. Dozens of fascinating projects have emerged worldwide since the model’s 2014 debut, but few of the scrambled entities we’ve seen over the years manage to look as handsome as the specimen pictured above.

Built by Jens vom Brauck of JvB-Moto, the commission came directly from BMW with a brand-new R nineT Scrambler as the donor. Jens had been tinkering with two-wheelers on a professional level ever since 2001, so it should go without saying that he was fully prepared to knock this undertaking straight out of the ballpark and into the stratosphere.

Normally, the parts used on JvB’s builds are replicated and added to the firm’s extensive aftermarket catalog, but that wasn’t the case with this particular exploit. Aiming to trim a bunch of visual mass from the bike’s uppermost section while retaining the muscular appearance of its twin-cylinder heart, vom Brauck had completely transformed the overall proportions during the makeover.

Before we take a closer look at his tasteful mods, let’s peek over the R nineT Scrambler’s spec sheet to gain a better understanding of what he was working with. Drawing power from an air- and oil-cooled DOHC power source that can produce up to 109 hp and 85 pound-feet (115 Nm) of torque, the Beemer is able to go from zero to 60 mph (96 kph) in just 3.5 seconds.

It will eventually top out at 124 mph (200 kph), with front-end stopping power hailing from dual hydraulic discs and Brembo calipers. The rear wheel is brought to a halt by a single 265 mm (10.4-inch) rotor paired with a twin-piston floating caliper, and suspension duties are the responsibility of 43 mm (1.7-inch) telescopic forks, a Paralever swingarm and an adjustable monoshock.

Deeming the nineT to be perfectly sound from a mechanical perspective, Jens decided to focus his efforts on the cosmetic side of things. Even so, it took him as many as eight months to make his vision a reality, with a great chunk of this time going towards bodywork fabrication. Once a satisfactory design had been sketched out, JvB-Moto's mastermind began by tackling the gas tank.

A smaller, yet much sexier 2.6-gallon (10-liter) fuel chamber was manufactured out of aluminum, but getting it to fit properly proved to be a challenge in and of itself. The donor’s airbox had to be refashioned, and it now carries modified dual intakes and carbon fiber covers. At the rear end, we find a custom subframe that’s been fabricated in-house, along with an aluminum tail section, LED lighting and fresh seat upholstery.

Moving on to the footwear department, vom Brauck installed CFRP wheel covers and a knobby set of TKC 80 tires from Continental. In and around the R nineT’s cockpit area, one may spot a bespoke headlight housing and a cross-braced handlebar, which sports the factory hand controls and minute LED blinkers on the levers.

The OEM exhaust headers have been retained, but they were tweaked and fitted with a solo muffler developed by Arrow. In terms of paintwork, the predominant color found on the motorcycle’s handmade fuel tank and tail is white, but the former also features snazzy graphics and a red-to-blue fade effect on the frontmost section.

 
 
 
 
 

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