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Crystal Concept Proposes a Visually-Striking Sailing Superyacht, Guilt-Free Luxury
The ideas of comfort or even luxury and minimal impact on the environment are not mutually exclusive. They are, however, the prerogative of the one-percenters for the time being. But that’s not to say that the rest of us can’t dream.

Crystal Concept Proposes a Visually-Striking Sailing Superyacht, Guilt-Free Luxury

Crystal superyacht concept uses the DynaRig system to sail across the Atlantic without burning fuelCrystal superyacht concept uses the DynaRig system to sail across the Atlantic without burning fuelCrystal superyacht concept uses the DynaRig system to sail across the Atlantic without burning fuelCrystal superyacht concept uses the DynaRig system to sail across the Atlantic without burning fuelCrystal superyacht concept uses the DynaRig system to sail across the Atlantic without burning fuelCrystal superyacht concept uses the DynaRig system to sail across the Atlantic without burning fuelCrystal superyacht concept uses the DynaRig system to sail across the Atlantic without burning fuelCrystal superyacht concept uses the DynaRig system to sail across the Atlantic without burning fuelCrystal superyacht concept uses the DynaRig system to sail across the Atlantic without burning fuel
When it comes to dreaming dreams, UK-based studio Coquine Design does a brilliant job. It’s right there in the studio’s description: “We do yacht design. And product design. And so much more. The creative process is like a dive down the rabbit hole: open your eyes and we’ll take you on a journey you’ll never forget.”

For the studio’s second project in as many months, Coquine proposes a sailing yacht with a very striking silhouette and the added benefit of being able to cross the Atlantic without using the engines. It’s pure luxury with zero guilt, and as such, it would be an environmentally-friendly billionaire’s ideal vessel.

The study is called Crystal, because it would light up like one when hit directly by sun rays. The hull features geometric glazing that brings to mind comparisons with the facets of a diamond, but that also allows the light to shine through. The lounge on the upper deck is also completely encased in glazing, which, again, would create the impression that the entire vessel is sparkling in the right light.

As visually impressive as all this might be, it’s not what makes Crystal a noteworthy project. That would be the fact that Coquine creative director Christian Leyk imagines it with hybrid propulsion, thanks to the DynaRig system. This is also what sets Crystal apart from other concept superyachts we may have covered along the years: this one could be built tomorrow if the right customer came along.

Crystal is not the kind of concept you can dismiss as vaporware, and it’s because of the DynaRig system. Leyk has previously been involved in the design of the Maltese Falcon and the Black Pearl (the 2018 Oceanco sailing superyacht, not Captain Jack Sparrow’s ship), which are the best-known examples of DynaRig sailing vessels. In fact, the Maltese Falcon is the first one to use this technology, which was first imagined in the 1960s by German engineer Wilhelm Prölß, but could only be developed in modern times.

A DynaRig sailing vessel has freestanding carbon masts that rotate in place at the touch of a button, allowing to adjust the angle of the sails for maximum efficiency. Fully deployed, the sails leave no gaps between them, which makes them act like a single panel. DynaRig sailing vessels can operate by wind power alone and boast incredible speed: for instance, the Falcon and Black Pearl can cross the Atlantic on wind power, maxing out at 25 knots and 30 knots, respectively.

In theory, at least, Crystal would be capable of comparable performance, so you’d get a luxury vessel that could sail across the Atlantic without burning fuel, on the condition that the weather is favorable. The ease of use of the DynaRig system would also make sailing with Crystal more comfortable and hassle-free than conventional sailing rigs.

With a total length of 99 meters (325 feet), Crystal would have a nature-inspired styling throughout, with plenty of open spaces and flowing lines. “Some emphasis was put on the interaction between inside and outside spaces, letting natural light in when you want to and giving you shadow when necessary,” Coquine says in the description.

Accommodation on board would be for 12 guests across six staterooms, with the full-beam master suite getting its own private deck and folding balconies. In addition to the glass salon, Crystal would also have a wine cellar, and several entertaining and socializing areas. Outdoor spaces would include a spa pool and various lounge areas, but also a beautiful beach club that would come with its own, fully-equipped gym. There would be some sort of garage for tenders and toys, but the description doesn’t include specifics on where, its size and capacity.

Crystal is only in concept stage as of the time of press, but Coquine Design hints at plans to further work on it. Yacht designer and interior architect Alexandre Thiriat, whose previous work includes the interiors of the Axioma, Madsummer and Ocean Victory superyachts, has been invited to do the interiors of Crystal. Coquine is also considering the option of bringing back the old team that worked on Maltese Falcon and Black Pearl, should there be more interest in this project.

Fingers crossed!



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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