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Crux Comp Gravel Bike Aims To Show the World What Can Be Achieved With $4,200
With the level of versatility gravel bikes can offer, it's no wonder they're taking off like SpaceX rockets. One team worth keeping an eye on is Specialized, and the new Crux Comp is the bike to show you what this crew can do.

Crux Comp Gravel Bike Aims To Show the World What Can Be Achieved With $4,200

Crux Comp Gravel Bike (Gloss Arctic Blue/Tarmac Black)Crux Comp Gravel Bike (Gloss Arctic Blue/Tarmac Black)Crux Comp Gravel Bike (Gloss Arctic Blue/Tarmac Black)Crux Comp Gravel Bike Arctic (Satin Smoke/Black/Cool Grey)Crux Comp Gravel Bike Arctic (Satin Smoke/Black/Cool Grey)Crux Comp Gravel Bike Arctic (Satin Smoke/Black/Cool Grey)Crux Comp Gravel Bike Arctic (Satin Smoke/Black/Cool Grey)Crux Comp Gravel Bike Arctic (Satin Smoke/Black/Cool Grey)Crux Comp Gravel Bike Arctic (Satin Smoke/Black/Cool Grey)
Folks, Specialized has been around since before some of us were born, since 1974 to more precise. Since then, Specialized has grown to be a cycling name seen under some of the world's peak athletes.

Nowadays, they seem to be using their top-shelf bike-building methods in a rather booming branch of cycling, gravel biking, and Crux Comp is meant to show the world just what can be achieved with 4,200 USD (3,702 EUR at current exchange rates).

Suppose you happen to come across the manufacturer's website. In that case, one phrase that stands apart is "the lightest gravel bike in the world." That's a pretty bold statement considering that bike manufacturers are always trying to make their machines lighter. Then there's a question of cost: Really, just a tad over $4K? Apparently so.

How light is this trinket? Well, Specialized states that their S-Works frames come in with 725 grams, and the normal Crux Comp frames weigh in at 825 grams.

This was achieved by taking what Specialized learned from building Aethos, a machine that sold out in one day, and applying that knowledge to Crux. I've also added a couple of photos of the S-Works Aethos for comparison, and I must say that the resemblance is striking, especially when it comes to the tubing.

Speaking of tubing, I bet you figured out that this bike is completed using carbon fiber as the main building component. Well, the fork is carbon too and made by S-Works, Specialized's more, for lack of a better word, "specialized" branch.

The geometry seems a bit more relaxed than Aethos, but tube shaping is, once again, similar. One component I enjoyed the visual feel of is that head tube. The way the top tube and down tube join this component looks, uhh, silky smooth. But that could just be the paint and primer.

As for the drivetrain, Specialized chose to run with SRAM and their Rival 1x drivetrain. Hydraulic shift levers move a long cage derailleur and KMC chain on a SunRace 11-speed cassette with 11-42T. The SRAM team also handles braking with a pair of hydraulic disc brakes, but no mention of rotor size on the manufacturer's website.

By looking at the frame, I noticed that it seems ready to be mounted with a front derailleur; 2x drivetrains, anyone? Some mounts for things like water bottles are part of the frame too, but I don't see any mounts for fenders or racks. This one's all about getting dirty and kicking up dust in your buddy's face.

At the front of the bike, the cockpit seems to have received some attention. An Adventure Gear handlebar with a 12-degree flare is secured with a 3D-forged alloy stem. The saddle features steel rails, but the seat post is made of carbon to help reduce more vibrations from the road.

Speaking of reducing vibrations, bikes like these rarely feature a fork with suspension, so wheels and tires are crucial. On Crux Comp, you'll find DT Swiss G540 wheels and Pathfinder Pro 2BR tires with tan sidewalls showcasing 700x38 dimensions. Inner tubes are found, so grab a can of sealant.

As for how much all of that is going to weigh, Specialized doesn't make a mention. It might be a trick to get you down to one of their dealerships to ensure you don't go home empty-handed; no reason why you should.



 
 
 
 
 

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