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Complete 1974 BMW E9 Barn Find Recently Pulled from Storage With Just 46k Miles

The BMW E9 officially entered mass production in 1968, but the 3.0 CS engine option was introduced in 1971 alongside the 3.0 CSi to replace the 2800 CS units. The twin-carburetor engine developed 178 horsepower (180 PS) and was offered with either a 4-speed manual or a 3-speed automatic transmission.
1974 BMW E9 25 photos
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The same engine mated to an automatic gearbox is also the one putting the wheels in motion on this 1974 model, though right now, it’s not exactly clear if the powertrain still works or not.

But what we do know is that it’s a car recently pulled from storage, though as you’ll see in the next few paragraphs, several important details are missing from the ad published by eBay seller gpc566.

First and foremost, not only we’re not being told if the engine is running or not, but we also don’t know how long the car has spent sitting and whether the storage conditions have been appropriate or not. Because if they haven’t, there’s a chance rust has already taken its toll, in which case someone willing to restore the BMW would have a lot more work to do.

On the other hand, the seller says additional information related to the vehicle’s condition is available per request, so you know what you have to do if you’re interested in buying the car.

There are several inaccurate and contradictory tidbits in the listing. First and foremost, the seller claims this is a 3 Series, when in fact, it’s a 1974 E9 (maybe the seller was tricked into believing it’s a 3 Series because of the engine designation?). Also, the eBay ad summary indicates this is a manual E9, but as you can see in the photos, there’s an automatic transmission in there.

The good news is the car comes with just a little over 46,000 miles (approximately 74,000 km) on the clock and given everything is original, there’s a solid chance the mileage is correct too.

At first glance, this is quite a rare find, but a closer inspection is definitely recommended given the questionable details. The car is listed for auction with a $35,000 starting price, but the reserve is yet to be met.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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