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Collectible 1993 Honda CBR900RR With Low Mileage Comes Close to Outright Perfection

If an iconic sports bike from the nineties is what you’re after, the CBR900RR will tick all the right boxes.
1993 Honda CBR900RR 23 photos
1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR1993 Honda CBR900RR
Having ushered in an entirely new era of sports bikes, the CBR900RR Fireblade will always be regarded as one of Honda’s most iconic motorcycles. Its cult classic status is sure to fill collectors’ hearts with pure bliss, and things aren’t any less impressive when it comes down to the riding experience!

Designed under the leadership of Tadao Baba, this fabled legend debuted in 1992 and was considerably lighter than its competition. As far as weight goes, the nearest rival Honda faced at the time was Yamaha’s FZR1000, weighing 75 pounds (34 kg) more than the revered CBR. Exemplars of the first generation (aka SC28) came with a carbureted 893cc inline-four as their power source.

Flanked by an aluminum twin-spar frame, this liquid-cooled titan packs quad 38 mm (1.5-inch) Keihin CV inhalers, dual overhead cams, and a total of sixteen valves. When prompted, it can produce as much as 122 hp at 10,500 revs and 65 pound-feet (88 Nm) of twist lower down the rpm range.

The oomph is handed over to the rear wheel by a six-speed transmission and a chain final drive, allowing the Fireblade to run the quarter-mile distance in 10.8 seconds. It’ll ultimately plateau at a top speed of 160 mph (257 kph) while tipping the scales at just 408 pounds (185 kg) on an empty stomach.

Braking is the product of dual 296 mm (11.7-inch) discs and four-piston Nissin calipers at the front, along with a single 220 mm (8.7-inch) rotor and a two-piston caliper at the rear. For suspension duties, the CBR900RR uses a full suite of Showa components – 43 mm (1.7-inch) cartridge forks up north and an adjustable remote-reservoir monoshock down south.

What you’re seeing above these paragraphs is a 1993 model that reads less than 8k miles (13,000 km) on the clock, and it’s heading to auction equipped with a Sudco slip-on exhaust muffler! You’ve got until September 20 to submit your best offer on Bring a Trailer, but don’t expect that topping the current bid of $6,200 will be the end of it.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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