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Clean and Mostly-Stock 1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy Is a Breathtaking Sight to Behold

What it lacks in terms of power is more than made up for by its sexy looks and nimble handling.
1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy 20 photos
1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy
Aside from some minor scratches and a bit of oxidation, this 1989 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy is in tip-top shape from head to toe. The bike was sold to its latest owner less than a year ago, subsequently receiving a modern spark plug, youthful motor oil and a replacement air filter. Moreover, its drive chain was recently cleaned and lubricated to ensure a smooth power delivery to the rear wheel.

Under previous ownership, this GB500 saw its original ignition system replaced with an aftermarket CDI module. Honda’s cafe racer is now getting ready to change hands once again, and you may check it out on Bring a Trailer until Monday, July 25! There’s no way of knowing where the predetermined reserve price stands, but what we can tell you is that you’d need about six grand to get ahead of the top bidder (for now).

Nodding to the elegant design language of classic British twins, the ‘89 MY Tourist Trophy draws power from an air-cooled 498cc single-cylinder engine. This four-stroke thumper features dry sump lubrication, a hemispherical combustion chamber and four valves operated through a single overhead cam.

Joined by a five-speed transmission, the mill is capable of delivering up to 38 ponies and 26 pound-feet (35 Nm) of torque at the crank. As soon as it makes contact with the pavement, this power can lead to a top speed of 108 mph (174 kph). The motorcycle’s suspension consists of 35 mm (1.4-inch) telescopic forks and twin progressive shocks with five-way adjustable preload.

At the front, braking duties are handled by a drilled rotor and a two-piston caliper, while the rear D.I.D wheel is brought to a halt thanks to a drum unit measuring 140 mm (5.5-inch). When its 4.4-gallon (17-liter) fuel tank is devoid of any gas, the GB500 weighs in at a very modest 359 pounds (163 kg).

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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