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Classic Kawasaki KZ750B Goes on A Custom Pilgrimage, Returns Looking the Part

Browsing this article’s photo gallery will definitely have you buzzing.
Kawasaki KZ750B 12 photos
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Over the last few months, we checked out Holger Breuer’s portfolio on multiple occasions to admire the juiciest pieces of bespoke machinery bred in his workshop. For example, the autoevolution pages were recently honored with the presence of a cafe racer-style Honda CB750 looking seriously rad.

Several other masterpieces like this unique four-banger have been crafted by the moto doctor in Husum, a coastal town located in Germany, where he operates under the alias of HB-Custom. Today, we’ll examine yet another one of Holger’s mechanical marvels, namely a 1979 Kawasaki KZ750B adorned with a generous dose of aftermarket wizardry.

The donor is put in motion thanks to an air-cooled DOHC parallel-twin engine, which packs four valves and a displacement of 745cc. At 7,000 spins, this bad boy can summon 55 ponies and 45 pound-feet (61 Nm) of twist lower down the rpm range. Without further ado, let’s see what Breuer has achieved on this spectacular venture.

First, he tasked Ingo Wurbel of Old School Superbikes with rebuilding the machine’s powerplant. As soon as the twin-cylinder mill returned carrying new valves, bearings, and pistons, HB-Custom's solo mastermind busied himself with installing a fresh exhaust system and dual Mikuni TM34 carburetors, which sport premium K&N air filters.

After fitting a lithium-ion battery and a KZ750 LTD’s electronic ignition module, the next step consisted of rewiring the beast using modern goodies. Furthermore, the addition of Koni shock absorbers and grippy Heidenau K67 tires bring about a considerable upgrade in terms of handling.

At the rear, we find a classy leather saddle sitting atop a revised subframe, as well as a chromed fender, Kellermann blinkers, and an aftermarket taillight. On the other end, you will spot a minute speedometer and bar-end turn signals from Motogadget, while Magura is responsible for supplying the handlebar. The finishing touch comes in the form of a repurposed headlight transplanted from a BMW R45.

 
 
 
 
 

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