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Classic Car Prospector Stumbles Upon a 30s V12 Sedan Bonnie and Clyde Would Approve

Modern-day Bonnie and Clyde would probably roll around in a Lamborghini Aventador LP or a Ferrari SF90 Stradale. But none of these existed back in the 30s when they pulled their famous heists. If anything, their death car was a V8 1934 Ford Model 40 B Fordor Deluxe sedan.
Gas Monkey Garage V12 1936 Lincoln K-Series 7 photos
Gas Monkey Garage 40-plus Classic Car Find in AlabamaGas Monkey Garage 40-plus Classic Car Find in AlabamaGas Monkey Garage 40-plus Classic Car Find in AlabamaGas Monkey Garage 40-plus Classic Car Find in AlabamaGas Monkey Garage 40-plus Classic Car Find in AlabamaGas Monkey Garage 40-plus Classic Car Find in Alabama
We'd all love to get a piece of the raging V8s from the 30s. Considering their history, they must cost a hefty penny. Richard Rawlings from Gas Monkey Garage was fortunate enough to stumble upon such a car. It's not the famous Bonnie and Clyde death car, but much better, a V12 Lincoln Sedan.

I am no mastermind, but to pull off a successful bank heist today would require a stash of cash, a change of identity, multiple passports, and tons of tech to manipulate the system. Back in the 30s, all you needed was some adrenaline, firepower, and a powerful getaway car.

It explains why Bonnie and Clyde fancied the 1934 Ford Model 40 B Fordor Deluxe Sedan. It's even rumored that Clyde was so into these Ford Sedans that he wrote a letter to Henry Ford thanking him for designing such a great car.

Rawlings' new classic might not be the famous getaway car, but it's more aggressive. It's a V12 1936 Lincoln K-Series sedan. It's one of a few cars he got from a 40-plus classic car nest abandoned in a factory in Alabama.

Phipps, Gas Monkey Garage's technician, checks the car and runs it before going for a test drive with Rawlings. It's a successful test run, even though they barely made it back after coolant started gushing off an untightened cap (Phipps' mistake).

Rawlings, unlike Jay Leno, collects cars for profit. He doesn't plan on doing the restoration, and the new V12 1936 Lincoln K-Series sedan will likely get a new owner. We hope they give it a new lease on life, considering it's a running car with repairable cosmetic wear.

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