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Chipmakers Having the Time of Their Lives, Record Semiconductors Sold Last Year

The demand for chips continues to be extremely strong in pretty much every industry sector out there, so semiconductor manufacturers are simply working around the clock on shipping orders to customers.
The production of cars has been hit hard by the lack of chips 6 photos
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While at first glance this seems to be a major effort on both sides, chipmakers are clearly having the time of their lives, as the impressive demand means every single chip they make is selling like hotcakes.

In other words, their businesses have recorded a huge boom, and recent research published by the Semiconductor Industry Association reveals impressive figures.

The global semiconductor industry sales recorded a growth of no less than 26.2 percent in 2021 versus the year before. The total sales, therefore, reached $555.9 billion in just a single year, and it’s the first time in history when the industry’s sales exceeded half a trillion dollars.

December alone brought major growth as well. Chip sales totaled $50.9 billion, up to no more, no less than 28.3 percent versus the same month of the previous year.

In 2021, chipmakers sold a total of 11.5 trillion semiconductors to customers across the world, once again an all-time record that nobody would have imagined it’s possible.

The report reveals China is the largest market for chips, as it accounts for $192.5 billion of the total sales, while the Americas recorded the biggest growth last year. Sales in this region were up 27.4 percent.

As far as the automotive market is concerned, the demand for chips supposed to be installed on vehicles continues to be insane. As a result, sales of such chips skyrocketed in 2021, eventually reaching $26.4 billion, up to no less than 34.3 percent year-over-year.

Needless to say, everybody expects the demand to remain solid in the coming quarters, especially as the shortage is unlikely to be over anytime soon. And the more we rely on chips, the bigger the demand, so it’s pretty clear the semiconductor industry is likely to break more records rather sooner than later.

 
 
 
 
 

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