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CH-47 Chinook Does Awesome Pinnacle Landing to Save Suicidal Climber in Oregon

Mount Hood, the highest mountain in Oregon, was the scene of a spectacular mission being carried through with help from a massive military CH-47 Chinook helicopter.
Chinook helicopter makes pinnacle landing on Mount Hood, Oregon 20 photos
Photo: YouTube
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The mission ended with a death-defying, awesome “pinnacle landing” performed by the Chinook pilot, The Oregonian informs. The helicopter carried the suicidal climber and the rescue crew back to safety.

According to reports, the man had spent the night on the summit, having made the climb with the intention to end his own life. He changed his heart and called for help, which is when a rescue crew was dispatched to fetch him.

They made the climb partially on a snow mobile and then on foot, reaching the summit on Friday in the afternoon. Descent was impossible because of the weather, so a call was made to the Oregon Air National Guard, which sent one of the heavy Chinook helicopters to help them finish the job.

At an altitude of about 11,000 feet, the pilot turned the helicopter around and landed it with its 2 rear wheels on the slope, offering the rescue crew and the climber enough time to gain access to the cargo bay.

It's surreal,” pararescuer Joshua Kruse tells the media outlet of the rescue operation. “You just have to trust that the pilot knows what he's doing and that everyone is on the same page.”

You also have to know what you are doing yourself. In the case of pinnacle landings, the blades of the helicopter no longer spin above a person’s shoulder, but are at chest height. This means that all the men on the summit had to make their way into the aircraft ducking.

The 27-year-old climber, whose identity hasn’t been made public to the press, was taken to the hospital once they reached the ground. He is believed to be ok.

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About the author: Elena Gorgan
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Elena has been writing for a living since 2006 and, as a journalist, she has put her double major in English and Spanish to good use. She covers automotive and mobility topics like cars and bicycles, and she always knows the shows worth watching on Netflix and friends.
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