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Caton’s Austin-Healey 100 Restomod Is One Sweet Roadster

Headquartered in Coventry, which is the home of Jaguar since 1928, when the British automaker was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company, the peeps at Caton have reimagined the first of three Big Healeyes in grand style. Codenamed BN1, the 100 in the photo gallery is rocking a five-speed manual transmission instead of the original three-speed OD box.
Austin-Healey 100 restomod by Caton 20 photos
Healey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by CatonHealey by Caton
Presented with much pomp and circumstance two months ago, the Healey by Caton mixes traditional craftsmanship techniques with modern-day amenities that include light-emitting diodes for the headlights and DRLs.

The sympathetically redesigned front grille is complemented by an elongated front valance that hides the front chassis legs. Aluminum fenders with a clamshell-inspired construction, air vents and finishers beautifying the flanks, the removal of the rear trunk handle, and the rear trunk’s internal release mechanism bring more substance to Donald Healey’s rarefied sports car. From 1953 through 1955, merely 10,030 units were produced.

Despite retaining its original badges, the car flaunts a subtle addition to the front fenders in the guise of Caton logos. Period-style black aluminum wheels are shod with Michelin rubber shoes, and the original column shifter is out in favor of a centrally-mounted lever for the all-new transmission.

Caton’s pedal box allows taller drivers to fit just nicely, and there’s no infotainment system to detract from the driving experience. Be that as it may, a couple of charging ports are provided. Caton has also modified the door cards and pockets to accept water bottles and various other tidbits.

Under the hood, you’ll find a 2,954-cc engine that cranks out 185 ponies and 195 pound-feet (264 Nm) of torque. Although based on the period-correct block, it’s a very different animal both on paper and from the driver’s perspective. As a brief refresher, the 2,660-cc engine of the BN1 originally produced in the ballpark of 90 horsepower at 4,000 rpm.

Limited to 25 units at £474,000 (make that approximately $585,000) before options, the Caton by Healey can be specified exactly as the customer wants by the Signature Studios. “It will be our privilege to collaborate with Caton’s customers to specify their car to their exact requirements,” declared Tim Strafford, the chief exec of Caton’s vehicle-building partner, Envisage.

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