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Cars Lost in Felicity Ace Fire Will Be Replaced, Volkswagen Group Brands CEOs Confirm

The Felicity Ace caught fire on February 16 and sank two weeks later, taking with her around 4,000 cars to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. Many of them were high-end vehicles, including out-of-production Lamborghini Aventador Ultimae editions that were said to be irreplaceable. The good news is they are totally replaceable, as confirmed by CEOs of the Volkswagen Group’s premium brands.
The cars lost in Felicity Ace fire will be replaced 7 photos
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Automobili Lamborghini CEO Stephan Winkelmann attended an online roundtable with journalists from the U.K. and U.S. According to Automotive News, the Italian supercar maker scrambled to replace the $500,000 hand-crafted Aventador Ultimae editions aboard sunken Felicity Ace. This is a given now.

“This was the edition which was closing the production of the Aventador, and there were 15 on board of the ship,” Winkelmann said. “We put our heads together, and luckily, we are able to replace those cars, so there will be no loss for our customers in the U.S. due to the sunken ship. This is good news. And all the rest we are able to replace. The Aventador was tricky, but we made it.”

Two weeks after Felicity Ace sank we learned new details about the cars onboard. Previously information showed there were 85 Lamborghinis there, most of them Urus SUVs. Lamborghini is not the only brand that lost cars in the Felicity Ace fire. Bentley CEO Adrian Hallmark confirmed the brand lost 189 cars, of which more than half will be replaced immediately, with the rest replaceable within six months.

“We've already found a solution for 100 that we can rapidly redirect, and we will catch the others up within six months,” Hallmark said. “We've promised those customers, and we're doing some clever things with dealers to keep [those customers] mobile, which I won't talk about.”

Audi lost the most cars when Felicity Aces sank on March 1st. Audi CEO Markus Duesmann confirmed that around 1,800 cars are now at the bottom of the ocean. All of them should be fairly easy to replace, even though it will take some time.

 
 
 
 
 

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