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Car T-bones a Bus and Sends It Flying into Pole that Takes the Lights Out

For whatever reason, this next crash really managed to tickle our funny bone. I mean, it's not an everyday occurrence that you get to see a bus t-boned while the lols are triggered within a couple of seconds of the video's start.
Car T-bones a Bus, Which Hits Pole While on Two Wheels: Lights Out 1 photo
Because they're the size of land whales, buses seem impervious to damage. However, most of the space they needlessly occupy is made up of the passenger compartment, so they're not as heavy as appearances lead you to believe.

A vehicle traveling at a high enough speed can theoretically knock a bus so hard that it becomes a two-wheeled crashing machine. But the theory was put into practice in Brazil a couple of weeks ago.

Ignoring a red light, the driver of the bus enters an intersection and immediately gets smashed into by a car. We can't tell precisely what model that is, but it appears to be an old Honda Civic hatchback. Weighing in at about one ton, the car compensates by carrying enough speed to change the bus' trajectory.

A fraction of a second later, one of the light poles gets hit. Sparks fly everywhere, and the electric current to the entire neighborhood is cut. Thankfully, the camera that managed to film the incident not only runs on a separate power supply, but it also comes with a night vision mode.

Luckily, despite the high speed and distructive nature of the crash, nobody dies. Both drivers sustained minor injuries, and the power was also restored within a few hours.

The guy who uploaded this video on Youtube says the small automobile had the green light. He suggests that all the stop lights at small intersections need to be removed in Rio de Janeiro and replaced by indicators.

However, we'd argue that lights only work when drivers obey them. The same thing can be said about indicators. In theory, anybody that recklessly endanger lives by running a red light at high speed shouldn't be allowed to drive for at least a year. "But you can't take my livelihood officer," says the driver of the bus, and we're back to square one.

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