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Cadillac Eldorado Twin-Turbo Widebody "Dragster" Rendering Looks Outrageous

It's not uncommon for a classic Rolls-Royce to get a modern makeover, even one with twin-turbochargers strapped to the Six and Three-Quarter. But for the better part of half a century, Cadillac was also a prime luxury automaker.
Cadillac Eldorado Twin-Tubo Widebody Rendering Looks Outrageous 8 photos
Cadillac Eldorado Twin-Turbo Widebody "Dragster" Rendering Looks OutrageousCadillac Eldorado Twin-Turbo Widebody "Dragster" Rendering Looks OutrageousCadillac Eldorado Twin-Turbo Widebody "Dragster" Rendering Looks OutrageousCadillac Eldorado Twin-Turbo Widebody "Dragster" Rendering Looks OutrageousCadillac Eldorado Twin-Turbo Widebody "Dragster" Rendering Looks OutrageousCadillac Eldorado Twin-Turbo Widebody "Dragster" Rendering Looks OutrageousCadillac Eldorado Twin-Turbo Widebody "Dragster" Rendering Looks Outrageous
Lexus is a pretty young brand, and back in the 1950s, BMW was closer to a boutique automaker than the production powerhouse it is today. Audi - what's that? Never heard of it.

Classic Cadillacs are often ignored by the American car-loving community. While the muscle cars from 1970-ish are seen as non-pretentious exotics, only a few of these flamboyant 50s and 60s designs are ever enjoyed, mainly the Chevy Bel Air and the C1 'Vette.

But if you want the biggest rocket fins and the largest chromed surfaces, it's got to be a Cadillac. The Eldorado had quarter-pannels that were 9-feet long. It had curved glass, thrusters for taillights and a grille that looked like it was made from bullets.

The interior must have had more leather than any other car at the time, and it was on full display thanks to the convertible top. This was the car for the type of person who never asked for extra vegetables or if he was allowed to smoke, the self-made business owner who worked hard and isn't afraid to show it off.

Pushing all 220 inches of American metal, the Eldorado's engine of choice was usually a 6.4-liter or a 7-liter in this era. However, by the late 60s, things really got out of hand with the 8.2-liter V8. This was never a brutally fast car, but rendering artist Kalim Oozeear picked this to be his digital drift car of choice.

His crazy machine, rendered in pink, features deep-dish wheels sporting a massive widebody kit. The dragster theme is also evident in the twin-turbochargers cutting through the hood and the COPO-style bulge. Does this have a supercharger as well? All we know is Elvis might have loved this.




 
 
 
 
 

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