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Brat-Style Triumph Thruxton 1200 Is a Custom Jaw-Dropper With Abundant Retro Charm
This thing might actually trick a regular Joe with little knowledge of motorcycles into thinking that it’s a classic machine from a bygone era.

Brat-Style Triumph Thruxton 1200 Is a Custom Jaw-Dropper With Abundant Retro Charm

Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200Custom Triumph Thruxton 1200
Kingston Custom’s Dirk Oehlerking is best known for his wild art deco-inspired builds revolving around Beemers, the most notable of which is the R 18-based “Spirit of Passion.” In fact, this fascinating exploit went a lot further than your regular one-off affair, as the German craftsman had collaborated directly with BMW to develop a total of 18 limited-edition copies.

Dirk’s fascination with motorized beasts on two wheels goes all the way back to his early childhood, and he jokingly claims that he must’ve been “born with a mixture of oil and gasoline in his blood.” When the eighties rolled around, the guy entered his first motocross race on a borrowed Yamaha and kicked it straight out of the ballpark!

Even though he was competing against more experienced riders, Oehlerking managed to secure a 1st place finish, to everyone’s surprise. The following years saw him earning north of 230 trophies and awards, but annihilating his opponents on dirt tracks wasn’t the only thing this fellow would excel at. Dirk was quickly learning the ropes with metalworking techniques, and his focus began shifting from MX competitions to a professional career.

The lad went on to pursue an array of full-time employment opportunities in his chosen line of work, including a vacancy at a prestigious limousine builder based in Hamburg. However, the ultimate goal was to eventually make a living out of motorcycle customization – a vision that would later materialize in the form of Kingston Custom.

A full decade has passed since Dirk’s garage opened its doors for the very first time, and the hype surrounding his work continues to grow with each project he unveils. What we’re about to admire is a stunning brat-style Triumph Thruxton built by Kingston’s solo mastermind a few years back. Not only does this specimen manage to look absolutely thrilling, but it also retains all the functionality of its stock counterpart.

After he’d dismantled the Thruxton 1200, Dirk Oehlerking kicked things off by nickel-plating its double cradle framework to add some visual bling. Then, he proceeded to repaint the OEM fuel chamber in a two-tone color scheme, which is topped with white pinstripes and Kingston Custom graphics on either side. Towards the rear end, you’ll spot a bespoke saddle wrapped in Alcantara upholstery, as well as a new fender and one snazzy LED taillight.

Underneath the fresh seat, we see a handmade electronics box where the donor’s stock side covers and airbox had once sat. The original battery was promptly replaced with a smaller lithium-ion alternative that’s mated to a simplified wiring harness. With these items in place, Oehlerking turned his attention to the bike’s twin-cylinder powerplant.

Keeping things nice and simple, he fitted the liquid-cooled 1,200cc engine with dual retro-style air filters and a unique two-into-two exhaust system built to his specification by Hattech. The seamless pipework was manufactured using stainless steel, and it terminates in a pair of reverse megaphone mufflers.

Additionally, Dirk had the ECU remapped in order to suit the aforementioned mods, thus concluding the powertrain adjustments. In terms of suspension upgrades, the Thruxton’s 41 mm (1.6-inch) Kayaba forks were beefed up with higher-spec internals, while its factory shock absorbers have been deleted in favor of premium YSS hardware. The whole ordeal rolls on 18-inch Excel hoops, whose rims are clad in Shinko 270 Super Classic rubber.

Up in the cockpit area, one may notice an ABM top clamp, aftermarket instrumentation, and a custom-made handlebar, which sports LSL grips and Motogadget bar-end blinkers. For the finishing touches, Kingston’s moto surgeon added a classy headlight at the front, along with new foot pegs and a drilled sprocket cover toward the rear end.

 
 
 
 
 

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