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Born to Be Upgraded: C-Code 1966 Mustang Receives 4-Barrel Muscle, Ends Up Abandoned

Ford was offering a little something for everybody on the 1966 Mustang, but if you weren’t necessarily interested in a grocery-getter, the base six-cylinder clearly didn’t make any sense.
1966 Ford Mustang 23 photos
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But when it comes to V8s, the pony was available with a wide range of choices, starting with the C-code model fitted with a 289 (4.7-liter) unit. Equipped with a 2-barrel carburetor, this 289 developed 200 horsepower, with the output remaining unchanged until the model year 1968, when it dropped to 195 horsepower.

This Mustang that was recently posted on eBay by seller steelponyrides4u was also born as a C-code model, but on the other hand, the 2-barrel muscle is long gone. This is because the powertrain was upgraded with a 4-barrel carburetor, essentially converting the Mustang into an A-code pony (when stock, the 289 4-barrel developed 225 horsepower).

As anyone can easily tell from these pictures, this Mustang is a project in all regards, and the owner claims the car has been sitting for several years.

This isn’t necessarily a surprise given its current condition, as the rust has already invaded parts of the metal, including the floors and the trunk.

Without a doubt, the car is going to require a lot of work, but the seller hopes the rare interior colors and the above-the-average condition of the body would qualify it for a proper restoration job.

Of course, everything comes down to the selling price, as the car can be yours for $5,000. At first glance, this appears to be a rather optimistic expectation, especially given the rough overall shape, but the seller has also enabled the Make Offer button just in case someone has another deal in mind.

For now, however, this Mustang seems more appropriate for a restomod, but obviously, this could only happen at the right price.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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