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Born and Raised in Arizona: 1969 Pontiac GTO Ram Air III Proves Rust Doesn’t Hurt a Legend

Just like in 1968, the 1969 Pontiac GTO was offered as standard with the famous 400 V8 rated at 350 horsepower. So as far as the base model was concerned, the 1969 GTO was almost identical to its predecessor.
1969 Pontiac GTO 20 photos
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But new for this model year was the upgrade received by the High Output (HO) engine, with the Ram Air III package pushing the power output from 360 to 366 horsepower.

The Ram Air IV was obviously the star of the show in 1969, as a series of upgrades, such as a large Rochester Quadrajet carburetor, brought the power rating to 370 horsepower.

The GTO that we have here was fitted from the factory (and still comes with) the Ram Air III coolness. And while the numbers are still matching, it’s not clear if the engine starts or not, though given it’s the original unit, there’s a chance it doesn’t.

After all, it’s important to keep in mind this is a project car in all regards. But on the other hand, it looks to be fairly solid and a very good candidate for full restoration, especially as it doesn’t exhibit any massive rust whatsoever.

The only metal problems can be seen in the photos and pretty much come down to surface rust that should be easy to fix during a restoration process.

While we don’t know if this GTO is complete and all-original, what we do know is the factory hideaway lights are still there and still working.

The biggest problem of this GTO, however, could be the selling price. eBay seller 4mobility isn’t willing to let it go for less than $25,000, and given its project car condition, this could be rather ambitious despite the Ram Air III coolness.

This is not an auction, so whoever wants to buy the car needs to pay the full price for it.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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