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Boat-Inspired Casa Ojalá Has 1,000+ Possible Configurations, Is Self-Sufficient
Camping’s younger and fancier sibling, glamping, is about to be taught a lesson in Italian sophistication by the movable, prefab, self-sufficient, and incredibly elegant cabin known as Casa Ojalá. The first prototype unit was unveiled last month at Rosewood Catiglion del Bosco, in Tuscany, Italy.

Boat-Inspired Casa Ojalá Has 1,000+ Possible Configurations, Is Self-Sufficient

Casa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glampingCasa Ojalá is a self-sufficient movable home that puts a new spin on glamping
Casa Ojalá is a cabin slash tiny home slash movable home, but it is also very hard to classify as just one of these things. It is, in fact, a little bit of everything, with the option to make it completely self-sufficient and personalized to your taste. With a design inspired by boat design, it boasts over 1,000 possible configurations and the ability to open up completely to the outside world.

It is “the future of luxury travel,” according to architect Beatrice Bonzanigo. She unveiled the concept at the 2019 edition of Milan Design Week and then moved to take it into prototype stage in partnership with Ryan Nesbitt. The company, also named Casa Ojalá, is now taking pre-orders on the units.

So what exactly is a Casa Ojalá? It’s a circular platform that stands on a cement and steel base, with a roof up top. From afar, it resembles a carousel, but it doesn’t spin. Also, from afar, it seems just that: an empty platform, with the exception of a bathtub, a stove, and maybe some personal objects scattered around. That’s because, using a complex system of pulleys, hand cranks, and sliding mechanisms, everything is hidden underneath: the double and single beds, the toilet, storage space, even the bathroom sink, and a shower.

Everything about the Casa Ojalá is customizable, with Bonzanigo saying that there are over 1,000 possible configurations for the layout. That means that each unit delivered is personalized to the taste and preferences of the new owner.

The wooden walls move on iron rails, as do the fabric screens surrounding the platform, which serve as interior partitions. You can keep the unit as a single room, or you can create individual spaces with these screens, should you desire to. This kind of control over personal space is meant to offer owners and guests (no more than three people at a time) a “complete immersion in the landscape.”

That is also achieved thanks to the fact that you get completely cut off from the world when staying here. Bonzanigo drew inspiration from boat design, and her goal was clearly to make guests feel as if they’re floating in the middle of nowhere. So, you get no TV, no internet access, and no screens to intrude into your very special moment of communion with nature.

The platform is 6.20 meters (20.3 feet) in diameter and offers approximately 27 square meters (291 square feet) of living space, packed with the basics for comfortable living. There is no kitchen, but you could get a kitchenette, and you do have the stove. The platform is 6 meters (19.6 feet) high off the ground, accessible through a retractable metal ladder.

One unit can be hooked to the grid or made to be self-sufficient. Expect to pay extra for the latter option, which will include a 1.9-2.3kW panels system with 1kW storage, microfiltration and UV sterilization, anaerobic filtration system for gray water, and rainwater recovery system. Whichever model you choose, on or off the grid, the assembly doesn’t require any underground foundation and takes approximately one week.

In theory, Casa Ojalá is movable, though not exactly as movable as a wheeled tiny house. Should you wish to relocate, you can do so, but you have to consider special conditions for disassembly, transport, and re-assembly, the makers note.

Ideal for glamping or a seasonal retreat for occasional and limited use, Casa Ojalá stands out for offering a combination of ready-made luxury with a wide range of personalization options. It’s delivered completely furnished with all the stuff you pre-approve and handpick, with a layout of your choosing, ready to give you that break from civilization you’ve been wanting. Pricing for one unit hasn’t been disclosed, but the makers say they’re looking forward to international deliveries this year. A waitlist is now open.



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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