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Beat-Up 1977 Yamaha XS750 Needs a Caring Owner Who Will Have It Properly Restored

You don’t necessarily have to spend five digits to obtain an iconic piece of UJM history.
1977 Yamaha XS750 23 photos
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You may not be able to tell when looking from afar, but this 1977 Yamaha XS750 is in desperate need of a complete restoration. The bike still runs, however, and its analog odometer indicates that it has covered approximately 29,500 miles (47,500 km) of tarmac. Under previous ownership, the OEM shock absorbers were discarded to make way for modern items developed by Progressive Suspension.

Instead of the standard airbox, you’ll find three individual aftermarket pod filters connected to its 34 mm (1.3 inches) constant-velocity Mikuni carbs. If you’d like to get a taste of the vintage UJM experience but don’t have a small fortune to spend on a first-gen CB750 or a Kawasaki Z1, then you may want to consider welcoming this XS750 into your garage.

That’s right; Yamaha’s classic triple-cylinder pearl is going under the hammer at this very moment, but you’ll have to act swiftly in order to get your hands on it. The no-reserve auction will be open on Bring a Trailer until tomorrow (June 22), and a mere three bidders have shown interest thus far. For now, the highest offer amounts to 1,000 freedom bucks.

Powering the ‘77 MY XS750 is a four-stroke 747cc inline-three engine with six valves, twin cams and a compression ratio of 8.5:1. The air-cooled mill is mated to a five-speed transmission, and it can deliver up to 64 ponies at 7,500 revs per minute. To reach the rear 18-inch cast alloy hoop, the herd advances through a shaft final drive.

As soon as it makes contact with the pavement, the oomph has the potential to result in a top speed of 117 mph (189 kph). On the other hand, stopping power is generated by a trio of solid brake rotors, all of which measure 267 mm (10.5 inches) in diameter. When its four-gallon (15-liter) fuel tank is empty, the Japanese artifact weighs in at 470 pounds (213 kg).

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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