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Audi RS6 Avant – A 20-Year-Old Savage, Casually Running Laps Against the Competition

Production for the first generation RS6 (C5) started in 2002. For 3 consecutive generations, Audi’s wagons were leaving the Neckarsulm production line as incomplete yet driveable cars. They went to an adjacent hall, where quattro GmbH workers would lift each car on a hydraulic lift and manually work on it for about 15 hours, adding the final parts.
Audi RS 6 20th anniversary 8 photos
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It would take until Audi’s fourth generation RS6 (the C8) for that to change and for the car to head towards the showroom straight from the assembly line, without additional manual labor needed. Plus, starting with 2020, the RS6 station wagon was also available in North America for the very first time (the only version previously available in the US was the C5 sedan version).

Part of its original DNA is still around – the all-wheel drive and Dynamic Ride Control suspension that could be found on the first generation RS6 have never left.

The second time around, the RS6 (C6) came in the game with 2 extra cylinders compared to the first generation, going for a total of 10.
580 PS (572 HP) and 650 Nm (479 lb-ft) of torque meant that, at the time, it overshadowed even the mighty R8 GT, which had a maximum of “only” 560 PS (552 HP).

If the third time’s a charm, Audi’s third generation RS6 (C7) wasn’t received that well, mainly because it went back on its “word,” returning to 8 cylinders. With a 3.9 liter displacement, it was the smallest RS6 engine ever. Yet, the power was still there – 120 kg (265 lbs.) lighter, six cm (2.4 in) wider, with better weight distribution and 700 Nm (516 lb-ft) of torque, the C7 could reach 100 km/h (62 mph) in just 3.9 seconds, leaving critics in the rearview.

Today’s current, fourth-generation RS6 (C8) is, according to Audi, “the best to date.” Supported by a 48 volt mild hybrid system for the first time ever, with a 100 km/h (62 mph) time of 3.6 seconds, new all-wheel steering, and looks to die for (among other improvements), it seems like Audi has done the best they could with the C8.

Unlike its predecessors, this one is complete when leaving the assembly line, heading straight to the showroom. Still, Audi says their work here isn’t over, so one day, we’ll see how much better their station wagon superstar can get.

press release
 
 
 
 
 

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