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Audi RS5 Mule Spied Testing, Wears Full Camouflage and Wide Wheel Arches

Audi engineers are working on the next generation of the RS5, the most powerful version of the A5.
Audi RS5 prototype 13 photos
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We already know that the German automaker will unveil the second-generation A5 on June 2, 2016, but its performance versions will come much later.

The S5 is expected sometime next year, while the RS5 will come in 2018 as an MY2019 vehicle. There is still a possibility that the next RS5 will be launched before 2018, but we would not keep our hopes high on that matter.

Unlike previous prototypes spotted by our friends at SB-Medien, this example has bigger wheel arches, as well as additional air intakes in the front.

The hood also includes extra vents, and the track has been increased. As you can see, the prototype that Audi engineers are testing on public roads is heavily camouflaged.

The new Audi RS5 will use the Volkswagen Group’s MLB Evo platform, which will drop weight significantly. Thanks to the reduced mass, Audi’s next RS5 will be more nimble, more economical, and faster in the bends and the straights.

Other technological improvements include the 12.1-inch TFT display known as the “virtual cockpit,” as well as the latest MMI multimedia interface from the Ingolstadt brand. The next generation of the RS5 will mark the end of the ongoing 4.2-liter V8 engine and the introduction of a twin-turbo 3.0-liter V6 unit. The latter is presumably borrowed from Porsche’s Panamera S. Reports place the output of this unit above the 420 HP level of the Panamera S.

Like the ongoing RS5, Audi will employ its quattro all-wheel drive system as a standard feature. Manual gearboxes are not expected, and the model might come with a seven speed dual-clutch automatic, or with an eight-speed unit.

Considering the low number of customers that would buy a manual gearbox, Audi has probably decided not to develop a unit for this model. Porsche and other sports car makers are following the same trend.

 
 
 
 
 

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