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Audi RS Q8 Rumored for Geneva, Likely to Share Powertrain With Urus

Audi is known for previewing even its most detailed future actions with concept cars. And while it might be hard for some to believe that and RS Q8 is coming to Geneva, the thousands of Audi loyalists who have been asking for BMW X5 M rival might need some hope to hold on to.
Audi Q8 1 photo
The latest report from Autocar magazine is written in a tone that suggests the RS Q8 is a sure thing. Building on the successful debut of the Q8 concept in Detroit, Audi Spor will dump all its air intake carving, oval exhaust welding expertise into making the RS version look even sexier.

We can't wait to see what the front air intake looks like. And considering this is the second production-intent concept, some accompanying dynamic footage might be in the cards too.

In many ways, the RS Q8 will be the real sister car for the Lamborghini Urus. The Italians have already confirmed they will use a twin-turbo V8 for its torque and a regular automatic for its smoothness. But so will the Audi, and these features are even discussed in the report.

The output of both these cars should be at least identical to that of the S8 plus or the RS6 performance, meaning 605 horsepower. Even for a 2.something-ton SUV, that's enough to reach 100 km/h in 4 seconds or less.

The best way to understand this phenomenon is to look at the Audi R8 V10 and the Lamborghini Huracan. Even though they have the same engine and deliver similar performance, they are rarely mentioned in the same sentence. In fact, we've never seen a comprehensive comparison.

While the Urus and RS Q8 might occasionally step on each other's toes, there's no problem with Audi's other performance SUV, the SQ7. A lower and more sloped roof, a much wider eight corner single frame grille and a whole lot of money will separate these two 4-liter powerhouses that happen to burn different kinds of fuel.

 
 
 
 
 

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